Elizabeth (Fips) Witcher: 1843 Surry Co., NC Deeds

Thanks to Wayne Witcher for sending copies of deed records pertaining to the estate of Elizabeth Witcher, from which the following transcriptions were derived. Elizabeth, known as Betsey, was a “Fips” (Phipps) of Pittsylvania County, Virginia, born about 1760 and a daughter of John Fips, as discussed in recent posts.

John Fips received a land grant in 1760 in Lunenburg County, Virginia, then generated probate records in Charlotte County, Virginia in 1769 and 1770. His gift of a slave girl to Betsey was proven in 1779 in Pittsylvania County, after his death.

Elizabeth (Fips) Witcher, as the widow of her husband Ephraim Witcher, later appears in the Surry County, North Carolina deed records transcribed below, which are dated 1843. She had appeared in Surry County a bit earlier, in the 1840 census.

One of those records refers to a certain Shadrach Franklin. This name seems familiar. There was a Shadrach Franklin who supposedly was born about 1810 in North Carolina and who died in 1890 in Letcher County, Kentucky. Isaiah and Eve (Kennedy) Phipps (he was born about 1790) were in Letcher County for the 1850 census before moving in 1852 to Lawrence County, Indiana. Isaiah, presumably the same one, is referred to in the 1837 will of Samuel Phipps in Ashe County, North Carolina. Other Phipps family members moved from Ashe County, North Carolina to Owen County, Indiana, and the name Shadrach Franklin then appears in Owen County.

We’ve noted how the Littleberry (“Berry”) Phipps family, with a son named John Witcher Phipps, also migrated to Lawrence County, Indiana. Berry was born in North Carolina about 1800 in North Carolina according to the 1850 census. In that year, he was living in Lawrence County, Indiana next to Lewis Phipps.

This Lewis Phipps, by the way, would appear to be the one who was born about 1793 in North Carolina and married Margaret Rector, who was born about 1793 in Grayson County, Virginia, and who had a son named Jesse Franklin Phipps, born 1823 – yet another Jesse.

Taliaferro or Talliaferro Witcher, also mentioned in the deed records, is referred to as one of the heirs of Ephraim Witcher. He is discussed in a previous post. He would appear to be the same Taliaferro Witcher who signed the 1840 Ashe County, North Carolina administrator’s bond involving the estate of Joseph “Phips,” evidently the youngest son of Samuel Phipps, father of the Isaiah mentioned above.

From Surry County, North Carolina Deed Book 2, pp. 201-202:

[p. 201:]

“Witchers Heirs Division of Negroes

“To the worshipful the Court of pleas and quarter Sessions held for the County of Surry on the second monday of May next. In the case of Elizabeth vs William J Witcher and others petition for division of Slaves your commissioners beg leave to report that they met at the house of the said Elizabeth Witcher on the 20th day of Feb. 1843 after being duly Sworn did examine & value Said Negro Slaves mentioned in petition to Wit, Martin Lucy Trim Ambrose Pelly [or Polly?] Lucinda Hardin Haywood Chaffin Jackson Clemmons Carolina [or Caroline?] Crofford Judy Joel Jennet [or Jinnit?] Mary Ginny Martha Samuel & Edmond find that Benjamin Witcher have received $2.16 more than his proportional part we therefore made them in 11 lots which were drawn as follows to Talliaferro Witcher Lot No. 1 Martin Lucy & Haywood With the additional Sum of Six Dollars twenty cents from Lot No 10 it being 1/12 part Lot No. 2 to Daniel [or David?] Witcher Clemmons with the additional Sum of ninety Seven dollars and eighty Six cents due from Benjamin Witcher it making 1 1/12 part Lot No. 3 to Lacy Witcher Crofford with the additional Sum of ninety Seven dollars & eighty Six cents from lots No. 6 & 7 it making 1/12 Lot No. 4 to John Witcher Hardin & Samuel with the additional Sum of Six dollars and twenty cents from Lot No. 10 it making 1/12 part Lot No. 5 to Winston Witcher Trim & Mary with the additional Sum of fourteen dollars and fifty three and [page break – p. 202:] from Lot No. 10 it making 1/12 part Lot No, 6 to James Witcher Jackson & Marth [sic] pay to lot No. 3 thirty five dollars & forty Seven cents leaves him 1/12 part Lot 7 William Witcher Ambrose & Caroline paid to lot No. 3 fifty two [dollars] & fourteen cents which leaves him 1/12 part Lot No. 8 to Daniel Roberts and wife Elizabeth Edmund & Jiny pay to lot No. 2 Sixty eight dollars and forty Seven cents which leaves them 1/2 part Lot No. 9 to Milton H Hayner admr. [i.e. administrator] of Tob[i?]th Hayner decd. [i.e. deceased] Lucinda & Chaffin with the additional Sum of Six dollars and fifty three Cents from lot No. 10 which makes 1/2 part Lot No. 10 to Asa Pryor admr. of Sally Pryor decd. Judy and Joel pay to lots No. 1 No. 3 No. 4 No. 5 No. 9 forty three dollars and three cents which have 1/2 part Lot No. 11 to Nancy Witcher Pelly and Jennett [or Jinnitt?] pay to lot No. 2 twenty Seven dollars and fourteen Cents which leaves her 1/2 part given under our hands and Seals this the 26th April 1843

“[signed:]
E Thompson (seal)
Richd. Gwyn (seal)
Shadrach Franklin (seal)

“North Carolina Surry County May Term 1843
The within Report was returned into open court and Confirmed by the court and ordered to be registered

“[signed:]
F. K. Armstrong clk [i.e. Clerk]
By H C Hampt[on?] DC [i.e. Deputy Clerk?]”

From Surry County, North Carolina Deed Book 3, p. 53:

“T Witcher & others from E Witcher quit claim
State of North Carolina Surry County

“I Elizabeth Witcher for Value received do by these presents relinquish release quit claim transfer and assign to the Tenants in remainder or to their assigns when the original tenants in remainder have assigned all my interest & Estate in & to the following negro Slaves Martin Lucy Trim Ambrose Patty [or Polly?] Lucinda Hardin Haywood Chafin Jackson Clemmons Caroline Crawford Judy Joel Jinnitt [or Jennett?] Mary Gincy [or Giney?] Martha Samuel and Edmund & do hereby agree that the Said Negroes may now be divided among those who will be and are the proper owners at my death free and clear of the incumbrances [sic; encumbrances] of my life Estate on the above named negro Slaves In Testimony whereof I have hereunto Set my hand and Seal this the 13th day of February A D 1843 Signed Sealed and delivered in the presence of
[signed:] E Thompson

“[signed:]
Elizabeth her X mark Witcher (seal)

“Surry County Feby Term 1843

“The execution of within relinquishment was duly proven in open court by the oath of Elijah Thompson the Subscribing witness thereto & ordered to be registered

“Test [i.e. witnessed] F K Armstrong Clk [i.e. Clerk]”

Matthew Phripp, Sometimes Phipp: Jamaica & “the Orphan”?

The will of Charles Smith of Portsmouth Parish, apparently in Norfolk County in southeast Virginia, is dated 1773. The text comes from a transcript included in The Lower Norfolk County Virginia Antiquary, Vol. 4, footnotes on pages 73 and 74. That will, as transcribed, includes a reference to two individuals termed “my Friends Matthew Phipp Anna Phipp other ways Wright.” The phrase “other ways” was an archaic expression for “otherwise,” or, “in other words.” Put another way, she had married a Wright.

A prior post has discussed a certain Matthew “Phripp” (with an R), whose 1780 death was reported in the Virginia Gazette. Receipts and accounts from his estate appear to be housed at Colonial Williamsburg.

As noted earlier, he may have been the same person who, as Matthew “Phipp,” was made executor of the will of Joseph Hutchings in 1776. The will was from Henrico County, Virginia, but Hutchings is stated in the will as having moved from the borough of Norfolk to Richmond.

In addition, a 1768 issue of the Virginia Gazette referred to the estate of John “Phripp” of Norfolk and involving a Matthew “Phripp.” A reader commented that he would appear to have been born in 1735. He was, according to the comment, a Virginia militia colonel during the Revolutionary War and, further, was a merchant.

This becomes significant, as the comment has this Matthew Phripp as a partner in Phripp, Taylor & Co. along with Dr. James Taylor. The commenter also noted that, as a Freemason, Phripp presided over the 1777 Williamsburg convention which resulted in the formation of the Grand Lodge of Virginia. See here for more.

The reference to James Taylor seems of significance in that the will of Charles Smith, in which the name appears (at least in the transcription) as Matthew Phipp refers to Charles Smith’s son in law as being James Taylor. This, then, appears to show a close relationship among three men – James Taylor, Charles Smith, and Matthew Phripp or Phipp.

And then raises two interesting questions: First, was it Phipp or Phripp? If the name was Phipp, as in the will of Charles Smith and the will of Joseph Hutchings, then why was it otherwise represented as Phripp? And, even considering the fluidity of the spelling of surnames during this period, does Phipp equal Phipps?

In the Name of God Amen I Charles Smith Minister of Portsmouth Parish do hereby make my last will & Testament I give unto my Grand Daughter Abigail Taylor Five Hundred & Twenty Pounds Currency & my Molatto Woman Mary, & my new Bible I give unto my Grand Daughter Margret Taylor Five Hundred Pounds currency & my negro Girl Sylvia to be paid to each of Them when they attain eighteen Years of age my Executors not accountable for any Interest Till that period I give unto Mrs. Rebecca Newton and Mrs. Fernela Jameson Ten Pounds each as a small token of my regard for them I give unto my Friends Matthew Phipp Anna Phipp other ways Wright & my God Daughter Anne Sweny or Boush a proper ring each of them as a Small token of my Good will and of which I beg their Acceptance – I give unto my molatto Woman Mary three months of her Time fifty Pounds in Money and my Old 4to [i.e. quarto] Bible with the Spinning and Weaving Gears and implements in or about the house with her clothes &c I give unto my Daughter Alice Smith alias (Taylor) all other real or personal Estate I may have at my death, whatsoever my debts to be paid if any my Manuscripts to be burned my Body to be buried Decently in a plain pine Cophin near a cherry Tree bearing about S. W. from this house and upon this Glebe I appoint my Dearest Friend and Son in Law James Taylor & his wife Alice Smith or Taylor Executors of this my Will my Estate neither to be appraised nor Inventoried but they to Take it into their immediate posession Signed & Sealed this 24th January Anno Dom 1771 –

Test
William Playsted, Francis Miller Charles Smith & Seal

My will now is that after my within Mentioned Molatto Woman Mary Waits on my Grand Daughter Abigail Taylor one Year after my decease Thenceforward I emancipate & Set her free with all her future Issue forever October 30, 1772

Test
Wm. Playstead
Francis Miller

Charles Smith & seal
January Court 1773 proved & C as by order Book

The same volume of The Lower Norfolk County Antiquary in which this will was found also contains several “Phripp” references in the index. Those references are on pages 13, 21, 67, and 73, and refer to Ann Phripp, Anne Phripp, Jno. Phripp, Jr., and Matthew Phripp. The reference on page 73 is to the will of Charles Smith.

The references on page 13 are from Norfolk County marriage bonds. The first, dated 19 March 1761, involves the marriage of Stephen Wright to Ann Phripp. Signatures are by Stephen Wright, J. Phripp, and Sam Boush. Likely the J. Phripp was John, Jr. (below).

The other reference on that page is to a 15 Apr 1761 bond which immediately followed the earlier one. The second bond is for the marriage of James Taylor to Alice Smith. Signatures are by Jno. Phripp, Jr., Fernelia Ellegood, Jas. Taylor, and Chars. (Charles) Smith, who would be the Charles Smith of the will. Referring back to the will, we see that Charles Smith refers to one of his daughters as Alice Smith, alias Taylor.

This tells us that less than a month after Stephen Wright obtained a bond to marry Ann Phripp, somehow related to J. Phripp, a bond was issued to James Taylor to marry Charles Smith’s daughter Alice, with signature by Jno. Phripp, Jr.

On page 21 is another marriage transcript, also signed by J. Phripp. This one is for a 12 December 1764 bond for the marriage of George Braithwaite to Lucretia Williams.

Hannah Phripp, whoever she was, appears on page 67 in a list of slave owners in 1780 in Princess Anne County. This was evidently for “the Lower Precinct of the Western Shore.”

Princess Anne County no longer exists. The county was formed in 1691 and became a part of the city of Virginia Beach in 1963. The distance from Virginia Beach to Norfolk is about 18 miles.

The will of Charles Smith was dated 1771. A bit earlier, Jacob Ellegood “of the Borough of Norfolk, in Norfolk Co.” wrote a will dated 30 January 1768 and proved 18 February 1768. You will recall that Fernelia Ellegood signed the James Taylor marriage bond. You’ll also remember that the will of Joseph Hutchings referred to Hutchings as having been of the borough of Norfolk, with Matthew “Phipp” as executor.

The will of Jacob Ellegood, according to an article in The William and Mary Quarterly, says that among those whom Ellegood appointed as executors were Dr. James Taylor and, as the article puts it, “Capt. Matthew Phipp.” Ellegood refers to one of his sisters as Fernella Jameson, who was probably the Fernelia Ellegood of the James Taylor marriage bond.

So, now we have three wills – those of Ellegood, Smith, and Hutchings – all using the “Phipp” spelling, if the transcriptions or abstracts can be believed, with other records referring to apparently the same name as “Phripp.”

Fernella/Fernelia, by the way, is further discussed in the same William and Mary Quarterly article, in the next paragraph, as having married Neill Jamieson in 1761. Neill Jamieson is further described as a “Scotch Tory, who went off with Lord Dunmore.” Because of this, his property was confiscated.

One has to stop and wonder if Matthew Phipp/Phripp could have been a Tory, with who knows what eventual implications. The matter is actually addressed in an article in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography.

Relevant documents actually begin earlier than the link would indicate. A footnote on page 402 refers to Matthew Phripp as “one of the most prominent merchnats of Norfolk.” Further, a resolution was passed in 1776 which served to “entirely” exonerate him from what were described as “charges of disloyalty to Virginia.” Those charges are further discussed above the footnote, icnluding actual question and answer testimony. Squabbles with Lord Dunmore, and Matthew Phripp’s role in the same are also mentioned on page 404.

On page 405 appear references to “Capt. Matthew Phripp at Williamsburg” and an interesting testimony regarding him that was offered by Daniel Hutchings. You’ll remember that the 1776 will of Joseph Hutchings refers to Matthew “Phipp” as executor. Daniel Hutchings was cited as suggested that Matthew Phripp had been “extremely active in encouraging the people in Norfolk to get acquainted with Military Discipline, and prepare for defending their Country.”

Further, according to that page and the next, Matthew Phripp was made borough colonel and chair of the Committee of Safety. Phripp even took up arms against Lord Dunmore when the latter seized type from the printers of Norfolk, but Phripp couldn’t get anyone to join with him.

A 1776 record, however, goes into more detail about the Matthew Phripp affair. There it’s noted that although he showed himself a “friend to his country,” at one point he made an “unfortunate visit to Norfolk” at the invitation of his “aged parent,” who was not named. At that point, he became guilty of “falling into the power of Lord Dunmore.” The result was that “he yielded, and took the oath,” presumably an oath of loyalty to England. Later, however, he “manifested his willingness to support the common cause.” As a result, he was “restored to the confidence of his countrymen.”

The book Some Prominent Virginia Families contains some wording which, unfortunately, is a bit unclear. There it’s said that “In the handwriting of Col. George Blow,” a statement was made giving the grandparents of “his” mother as Matthew Phripp and Mary Mason. The suggestion is then made that this must have referred to the grandparents rather than parents, and that the parents were John Phripp and his wife Frances.

Reference is then made to a letter in which the writer said he thought that Matthew Phripp and Matthew Phillips were the same name. Since Phillips hasn’t surfaced in the records mentioned above, one must wonder whether he could have meant Phipps. On the other hand, the same book refers to the estate of Matthew Phillips, with the notation that it could have been Phripp.

Perhaps the name was fluid and could have been represented as Phipps, Phillips, or Phripp. Note the family in County Sligo, Ireland, with variant spellings such as Phibbs and Phipps. The account in Some Prominent Families refers to the Phripp name morphing into Phreep and evidently from there into Streep.

All of this might not be of consequence anyway, since the same book says that Matthew Phripp died in Norfolk without any children of his own, giving an estate to the children of his sister who married Stephen Wright.

The same source also reminds the reader, however, that Matthew Phripp is, in this book, closely associated with the Mason family, and a Mrs. Lemuel Mason married a Mr. Matthew Phillips. The writer says that “we hear no more” of the Phillips name in connection with this, yet the Phripp name was subsequently often associated with the Mason family.

Another potential issue has to do with this George Blow who was mentioned. Note that, much earlier, the guardian of the orphan John Phipps in Surry County, Virginia, a matter which was discussed extensively in recent posts, appears to have been one George Blow. (See Blow Family of Surry County, Virginia and Blow Citations in Surry & Isle of Wight County, Virginia, both of which are pdf files.) We’ve discussed the records which seem to tie an individual named George Blow to the orphan John Phipps, son of Elizabeth Harris. That Elizabeth (Phipps) is said to have moved from Isle of Wight County to Surry County, Virginia when she deed the mill at Sunken Marsh.

Those are not disparate places, but they are disparate times. The George Blow who was associated with “the orphant” must have been of an earlier generation, but perhaps was related. Isle of Wight County is in the immediate vicinity, and is today a part of the Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News Metropolitan Statistical Area.

The account in Some Prominent Virginia Families suggests that Matthew and Mary (Mason) Phripp appear to have been the parents of John Phripp, whose wife’s name was Frances. A 1761 record cited earlier refers to John Phripp, Jr. Who knows – could this family possibly eventually, if one was to trace it far enough, go back to John Phipps the orphan?

Adventurers of Purse and Person lists John Phripp, son of Frances Mason, as listed on the 1759 Norfolk borough tax list with his father. That source says that John died sometime before 10 November 1766, at which time administration was granted to Matthew Phripp.

In addition, a study of African-Americans at Jamestown (the same book which refers to John Phipps’s barn in Jamestown) says (p. 120) that blacks were brought to Jamestown in 1725 and 1726 onboard ships which were licensed in Williamsburg and which were owned by four individuals. The individuals named were Jeffrey Flowers, Dudley Digges, John Hutchings, and John Phripp.

We’ve already seen the Hutchings/Phripp association. These black slaves were brought into what’s now termed the Hampton Roads area from not only Africa, but also “from Barbados, Jamaica, Anguilla.” Here’s a reference to the Caribbean, and specifically Jamaica, yet again. We’ve seen a Jamaica connection again and again and again. Is that what’s going on here? Is this a Phipps family with yet another Jamaican connection?

Various other records have been transcribed in books, involving this Matthew Phripp and associates, such as Dr. James Taylor. Rather than cite them all here, perhaps looking at primary sources will eventually clear up this mystery.

Phipps, Virginia to Jamaica

The following appeared in The Public Ledger or, Daily Register of Commerce and Intelligence, published London, Tuesday, 15 January 1760, p. 12. The formula in such notices was to refer to, apparently, the ship name first of all, followed by its route, and then the captain’s name. That would suggest that this notice involved a ship called The Young Charles, captained by Phipps, en route from Virginia to Jamaica.

The Young Charles, Phipps, from Virginia to Jamaica, was taken the 18th of June, and re-taken by the general Amhurst privateer of New-York, and carried into Providence.

The Phipps mentioned could have been the James Phipps mentioned earlier who was a merchant in Yorktown, Virginia in the 1760s. He imported rum and sugar from St. Kitts in the Caribbean, as advertised in the Virginia Gazette, published in Williamsburg, in 1767 and 1768. Yorktown was about 13 miles from Williamsburg.

Early Grayson Co., VA

Thanks to Tim Phipps for writing the following:

Phipps in Early Grayson County, Virginia
by Tim Phipps

Researchers familiar with the Phipps family of Grayson County, Virginia, will immediately recognize the names of Benjamin Phipps (b. ca 1761/62) and Isaiah Phipps (b. ca 1769). According to many, these two individuals were considered brothers, though the identity of their father remains a much speculated mystery. A recent examination of the tax records from 1794 through 1820 for Grayson County predictably found both Benjamin and Isaiah listed in each year. In all these years, it is interesting to see that Isaiah never had blacks or slaves listed with him, while Benjamin did starting in 1799. It is also noteworthy that Isaiah was listed with a grist mill in 1813 and 1814 and with a mill in 1815.

The Grayson County tax lists also revealed the names of Phipps individuals who may not be as widely known or have previously been associated with Benjamin and Isaiah. One such person was Matthew Phipps who appears in the tax lists of 1794 through 1807. Since Matthew had to at least be 16 years of age or older in 1794, he would have been born in 1778 or earlier. Since he had two white males over the age of 16 living listed with him in 1807, one could presume that the second male was a son who would have been born by 1791. If this was the case, then it could suggest an even earlier birth year for Matthew, perhaps as early as 1771 or so. This would put Matthewís age closer to Isaiah, if he was not in fact older than Isaiah. Could Matthew have been a brother or a cousin to Benjamin and Isaiah? His disappearance from Grayson County after 1807 along with that second white male may have been due to a move from the area. The 1810 Census for Washington County, VA, reveals a Matthew Phipp aged over 45 (born before 1766) living next to a Jesse Phipp aged 16 to 25. This could be the same Matthew Phipps from Grayson County.

Another name that appears in 1801 and remains until 1807 is a Jacob Phipps. It is possible that this Jacob is the same one who was the son of William Phipps of Wythe County, VA, who died in 1818. This William had seven listed sons, and Jacob first appears in the 1800 Wythe County tax list but disappeared after that year. Since the Jacob in Grayson County first shows up in 1801, this would account for his disappearance from Wythe County after 1800 if he was indeed the same person. It is very likely that this Jacob Phipps is the same one who settled in Buncombe County, NC, where he can be found in the census records for 1820 and 1830, and later lived in Yancey County, NC, where was living in 1840 and 1850. This Jacob in North Carolina was born in Virginia and was married Nancy Hampton, who was from Wythe County, VA.

A Samuel Phipps and a Thomas Phipps both appear only in the 1795 tax list for Grayson Co. Joseph and William Phipps are first listed in 1807 and appear to have been the sons of Benjamin, who had a total of three white males age 16 or older listed with him in 1803, 1805 and 1806 (Benjamin only had 1 white male listed in 1807). The John Phipps who first appears in 1809 could be another son of Benjamin, and James Phipps who shows up in 1816 (and remains through 1820) also appears to be another one of Benjaminís son (Benjamin had two white males in 1814 and 1815 but only one in 1816). A second James Phipps only appears once in 1818 and was likely the son of Isaiah, who had two white males listed with him in 1815, 1816, 1817, 1819, and 1820 but only one in 1818. Lastly, an unknown Lewis Phipps was on the 1819 tax list but not there in 1820 (the same name does appear on the 1820 Census for Grayson Co.).

Source: Personal Property Tax Book, Grayson County, Virginia, 1794-1827, Microfilm Roll #139, Library of Virginia, transcribed by Tim Phipps (February 2015)

Note: The names on all of the following tax lists were alphabetically arranged by the first letter of the surname.

1794 Personal Property Tax List of Grayson County, Virginia [taken by Stephen Browne]
Page 30
— May 1, Benjín Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 4 Horses
— May 3, Matthew Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 1 Horse
— May 3, Isaah Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 3 Horses

1795 Personal Property Tax List of Grayson County, Virginia [taken by Jos Jackson]
Page 14 ñ [William & Thomas listed next to each other]
— Isaiah Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 4 Horses
— William Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 2 Horses
— Thomas Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 2 Horses
Page 15
— Samuel Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 1 Horse
— Mathew Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, no Horses
— Benjamin Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 5 Horses

1796 Personal Property Tax List of Grayson County, Virginia [taken by Samíl Cox]
Page 24
— March 22, Matthew Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, no Horses
Page 25 – [Benjamin & Isaiah listed next to each other]
— May 12, Isaiah Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 2 Horses
— May 12, Benjamin Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 4 Horses

1797 Personal Property Tax List of Grayson County, Virginia [taken by Nathaniel Vaughn]
Page 28
— March 11, Isaiah Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 2 Horses
Page 30
— May 26, Mathew Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, no Horses
— May 26, Benjamin Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 5 Horses, 1 Stud Horse with $12 Rate per Season

1798 Personal Property Tax List of Grayson County, Virginia [taken by Samíl Cox]
Page 33 – [Matthew & Isaiah listed next to each other]
— March 15, Matthew Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, no Horses, Tax Amt = $-.–
— March 15, Isaiah Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 2 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.18
Page 34
— March 21, Benjamin Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 3 Horses, 1 Stud Horse with $12 Rate per Season, Tax Amt = $2.27

1799 Personal Property Tax List of Grayson County, Virginia [taken by Jno Fielder]
Page 26
— May 22, Benjamin Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, 1 Black 12-16yrs, 3 Horses, 1 Stud Horse with $12 Rate per Season; Tax Amt = $4.80
— June 21, Isaah Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 3 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.36
— June 19, Mathew Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, no Horses, Tax Amt = $-.–

1800 Personal Property Tax List of Grayson County, Virginia [taken by John Fielder]
Page 24 – [all three Phips individuals listed next to each other]
— Matthew Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, no Horses, Tax Amt = $-.–
— Isaiah Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 3 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.36
— Benjimine Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, 1 Black 16yrs+, 2 Horses, 1 Stud Horse with $12 Rate per Season, Tax Amt = $4.68

1801 Personal Property Tax List of Grayson County, Virginia [taken by Flower Swift]
Page 29 – [all four Phips individuals listed next to each other]
— Jacob [not very legible] Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, no Horses, Tax Amt = $-.–
— Matthew Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 1 Horse, Tax Amt = $-.12
— Benjimine Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, 1 Black 16yrs+, 3 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.80
— Isaiah Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 2 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.24

1802 Personal Property Tax List of Grayson County, Virginia [taken by Flower Swift]
Page 27 – [all four Phips individuals listed next to each other]
— Jacob Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, no Horses, Tax Amt = $-.–
— Benjamin Phips, 2 White Males 16yrs+, 1 Black 16yrs+, 4 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.92
— Isaiah Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 2 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.24
— Matthew Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 2 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.24

1803 Personal Property Tax List of Grayson County, Virginia [taken by John Hail]
Page 13 ñ [Jacob, Isaiah & Benjamin listed next to each other]
— April 20 [?], Jacob Fips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, no Horses, Tax Amt = $-.–
— April 25, Isaiah Fips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 4 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.48
— April 25, Benjamin Fips, 3 White Males 16yrs+, 1 Black 16yrs+, 5 Horses, Tax Amt = $1.-4
Page 14
— April 25, Mathew Fips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 2 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.24

1804 Personal Property Tax List of Grayson County, Virginia [taken by Joshua Hail]
Page 28 – [Benjamin & Matthew listed next to each other]
— Benjamin Phips, no White Males 16yrs+, no Blacks, no Horses, Tax Amt = $-.–
— Matthew Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 1 Horse, Tax Amt = $-.12
Page 30 – [Jacob & Isaiah next to each other]
— Jacob Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, no Horses, Tax Amt = $-.–
— Isaiah Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 5 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.60

1805 Personal Property Tax List of Grayson County, Virginia [taken by John Hill]
Page 14
— April 6, Isaiah Fips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 3 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.36
— April 6, Benjamin Fips, 3 White Males 16yrs+, 1 Black 12-16yrs, 1 Black 16yrs+, 6 Horses, Tax Amt = $1.60
— April 6, Matthew Fips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 2 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.24
— April 12, Jacob Fips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, no Horses, Tax Amt = $-.–

1806 Personal Property Tax List of Grayson County, Virginia [taken by John Hill]
Page 30 ñ [Isaiah & Matthew listed next to each other]
— Benjamin Phips, 3 White Males 16yrs+, 1 Black 12-16yrs, 1 Black 16yrs+, 6 Horses, 1 Stud Horse with $1 Rate per Season, Tax Amt = $3.60
— Jacob Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 1 Horse, Tax Amt = $-.12
— Isaiah Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 4 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.48
— Matthew Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 1 Horse, Tax Amt = $-.12

1807 Personal Property Tax List of Grayson County, Virginia [taken by John Robinson]
Page 17, listed under ìFî Surnames [Benjamin, Joseph, William & Jacob listed next to each other]
— April 17, Matthew Phipps, 2 White Males 16yrs+, no Blacks, 5 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.60
— April 17, Benjamin Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, 1 Black 12-16yrs, 1 Black 16yrs+, 4 Horses, Tax Amt = $1.36
— April 17, Joseph Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 3 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.36
— April 17, William Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 2 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.24
— April 19, Jacob Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 1 Horse, Tax Amt = $-.12
Page 18
— April 21, Isaiah Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 6 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.72

1809 Personal Property Tax List of Grayson County, Virginia [taken by John Robinson]
Page 32 – [all five Phips individuals listed next to each other]
— March 12, John Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, no Horses, Tax Amt = $-.–
— March 12, Benjamin Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, 1 Black 16yrs+, 5 Horses, Tax Amt = $1.-4
— March 12, Joseph Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 2 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.24
— March 12, William Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 3 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.36
— March 12, Isaiah Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 6 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.72

1810 Personal Property Tax List of Grayson County, Virginia [taken by William Vaughn]
Page 32 – [all five Phips individuals listed next to each other]
— April 9, Benjamin Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, 1 Black 12-16yrs, 7 Horses, Tax Amt = $1.28
— April 9, William Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 4 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.48
— April 9, John Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 1 Horse, Tax Amt = $-.12
— April 9, Joseph Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 2 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.24
— April 12, Isaiah Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 7 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.84

1811 Personal Property Tax List of Grayson County, Virginia [taken by William Vaughn]
Page 27 – [all five Phips individuals listed next to each other]
— March 21, Benjamin Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, 1 Black 16+yrs, 9 Horses, Tax Amt = $1.52
— March 21, John Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 1 Horse, Tax Amt = $-.12
— March 21, Joseph Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 2 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.24
— March 21, William Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 3 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.36
— March 21, Isaiah Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 8 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.96

1812 Personal Property Tax List of Grayson County, Virginia [taken by John A. Grigg]
Page 26 – [Isaiah & William listed next to each other]
— March 19, Isaiah Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 8 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.96
— March 19, William Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 2 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.24
Page 27 – [Benjamin, John & Joseph listed next to each other]
— March 21, Benjamin Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, 1 Black 16+yrs, 9 Horses, Tax Amt = $1.52
— March 21, John Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 1 Horse, Tax Amt = $-.12
— March 21, Joseph Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 2 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.24

1813 Personal Property Tax List of Grayson County, Virginia [taken by John A. Grigg]
Page 30 – [Benjamin, Joseph, John & William listed next to each other]
— Isaiah Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 8 Horses, 1 Grist Mill, Tax Amt = $2.28
— Benjamin Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, 1 Black 12-16yrs, 1 Black 16+yrs, 9 Horses, Tax Amt = $2.62
— Joseph Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 2 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.32
— John Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 2 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.32
— William Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 3 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.48

1814 Personal Property Tax List of Grayson County, Virginia
Page 37 – [Benjamin & John listed next to each other]
— Benjamin Phips, 2 White Males 16yrs+, 1 Black 12-16yrs, 1 Black 16+yrs, 8 Horses, Tax Amt = $3.26
— John Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 3 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.63
— William Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 3 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.63
Page 38
— Isaiah Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 10 Horses, 1 Grist Mill, Tax Amt = $3.43
— Joseph Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 4 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.84

1815 Personal Property Tax List of Grayson County, Virginia [taken by William Bobbitt]
Page 32
— February 23, John Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 3 Horses, 12 Cattle, Tax Amt = $-.99
Page 33
— March 25, Joseph Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, 1 Black 9-12yrs, 3 Horses, 33 Cattle, Tax Amt = $2.12
Page 34 – [Benjamin, Isaiah, & William listed next to each other]
— April 4, Benjamin Phips, 2 White Males 16yrs+, 1 Black 12-16yrs, 1 Black 16+yrs, 3 Horses, 38 Cattle, Tax Amt = $4.42
— April 4, Isaiah Phips, 2 White Males 16yrs+, no Blacks, 10 Horses, 25 Cattle, 1 Mill, Tax Amt = $4.18
— April 4, William Phips, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 3 Horses, 15 Cattle, Tax Amt = $1.-8

1816 Personal Property Tax List of Grayson County, Virginia [taken by William Hail]
Page 34 – [all six Phipps individuals listed next to each other]
— February 15, Joseph Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, 1 Slave, 4 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.72
— February 15, James Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Slaves, 2 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.36
— February 15, Isaiah Phipps, 2 White Males 16yrs+, no Slaves, 12 Horses, Tax Amt = $1.76
— February 15, John Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Slaves, 4 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.72
— February 15, Benjamin Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, 2 Slave, 3 Horses, Tax Amt = $2.60
— February 15, William Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Slaves, 3 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.54

1817 Personal Property Tax List of Grayson County, Virginia [taken by William Hail]
Page 34
— April 11, John Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Slaves, 4 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.72
Page 35 – [Isaiah, Joseph, William & James listed next to each other]
— April 11, Isaiah Phipps, 2 White Males 16yrs+, no Slaves, 8 Horses, Tax Amt = $1.44
— April 11, Joseph Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, 1 Slave, 4 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.72
— April 11, William Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Slaves, 3 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.54
— April 11, James Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Slaves, 1 Horse, Tax Amt = $-.18
— April 12, Benjamin Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, 2 Slaves, 6 Horses, Tax Amt = $2.48

1818 Personal Property Tax List of Grayson County, Virginia [taken by Stephen Hail]
Page 36 – [John, James & Joseph listed together; Isaiah, James, Benjamin & William listed together]
— April 6, John Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Slaves, 5 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.90
— April 6, James Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Slaves, 2 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.36
— April 6, Joseph Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, 1 Slave, 4 Horses, Tax Amt = $1.42
— April 6, Isaiah Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Slaves, 5 Horses, 1 Stud Horse with $2 Rate per Season, Tax Amt = $4.90
— April 6, James Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Slaves, 1 Horse, Tax Amt = $-.18
— April 6, Benjamin Phipps, 2 White Males 16yrs+, 2 Slaves, 6 Horses, Tax Amt = $2.48
— April 6, William Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Slaves, 3 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.54

1819 Personal Property Tax List of Grayson County, Virginia [taken by Stephen Hail]
Page 39
— Lewis Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Slaves, 1 Horse, Tax Amt = $-.18
Page 42
— Isaiah Phipps, 2 White Males 16yrs+, no Slaves, 6 Horses, Tax Amt = $1.-8
— John Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Slaves, 4 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.72
Page 43
— Benjamin Phipps, 2 White Males 16yrs+, 2 Slaves, 7 Horses, Tax Amt = $2.66
— Joseph Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, 1 Slave, 5 Horses, Tax Amt = $1.60
— James Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Slaves, 2 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.36

1820 Personal Property Tax List of Grayson County, Virginia [taken by Matthew Dickey]
Page 38
— Joseph Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, 1 Blacks 12-16yrs, 6 Horses, Tax Amt = $1.78
— William Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, no Horses, Tax Amt = $-.–
Page 39
— James Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 4 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.72
— John Phipps, 1 White Male 16yrs+, no Blacks, 5 Horses, Tax Amt = $-.90
— Isaiah Phipps, 2 White Males 16yrs+, no Blacks, 7 Horses, Tax Amt = $1.26
— Benjamin Phipps, 2 White Males 16yrs+, 1 Black 12-16yrs, 2 Blacks 16yrs+, 7 Horses, Tax Amt = $3.36

Early Arrivals in Maryland

Trying to use the Maryland State Archives website can be an extremely frustrating experience. One of the searches in that site did yield several references in response to an “early settlers query.” The results are said to be derived from two sources: Gust Skordas Early Settlers of Maryland and Carson Gibb, Supplement to the Early Settlers of Maryland. (The site doesn’t offer further bibliographic citations.)

Microfilm references are obtainable in the website. Other notations refer to additional factors which aren’t completely explained. The index also does not explain whether the alternate spelling Phillips, as noted several times, is found in the actual record.

These records presumably refer to individuals who were transported directly to Maryland rather than migrating there from another American county.

  • An [sic; presumably Ann] Phipps (Phillips) – transported by 1671
  • Henry Phipps – transported himself by 1680
  • John Phipps (Phillips) – transported by 1671
  • Mary Phipps (Phillips) – transported by 1671
  • Mary Phipps (Phillips), Jr. – transported by 1671
  • Richard Phipps – transported 1679

1789 Lunenburg County, Virginia Chancery Record

An index to chancery records in the Library of Virginia website includes a Phipps reference in 1789 records from Lunenburg County. Nicholas Williams was the plaintiff, and the administrators of “Laraus” Williams were the defendants. The surnames mentioned in the record are Barnes, Bennett, Council, Drake, Hardy, Jackson, Johnson, Kirby, Love, Phipps, Smithson, Tisdale, Walker, and Williams.

The record has not, however, been digitized and placed online as of yet. The Library refers to LVA microfilm reel number 53, local reel number 9, and image number 263.

Lunenburg County in this time period should be of interest and the record could be relevant to the earlier discussion about the Fips/Phips/Phipps family in the area of Lunenburg, Pittsylvania, and Charlotte Counties. Recent posts have referred to the association with Tandey Walker, who could possibly be the Walker referred to in the record.

As far as the Bennett surname is concerned, a connection is possible to the Absalom Bennett family we’ve discussed earlier. The relationship between that family and the Phipps family seems to suggest a Phipps relationship between Brunswick County, Virginia and Wake County, North Carolina.

Phipps Carpenters and Ship or Boat Builders

The following might not mean anything, but it’s interesting to note how many carpenters or individuals with carpenter’s tools are in this list, as well as ship carpenters or individuals involved in some way with ship building or boat building:

  • Solomon Phipps, who came to Charlestown, Massachusetts from Wiltshire by 1640, was “a carpenter by trade.” (See here.)
  • William Phips, born 1650/1, who found sunken treasure and became governor of Massachusetts, started out as a ship carpenter. (See here.)
  • Edward Phipps, according to a Google Books “snippet,” was also apprenticed to a ship carpenter just as Sir William had been, date unknown. (See here.)
  • John Fips left an estate in Charlotte County, Virginia in 1769 which included carpenter’s tools. (here.)
  • Joseph Phipps of Chester County, Pennsylvania had carpenter’s tools in his estate in 1762. (See here.)
  • John D. Phipps of Clark County, Indiana, born about 1798 in Pennsylvania, was a carpenter. (See here.)
  • Thomas Phipps Tourner is described in the 1800 will of John Phipps in England as a carpenter of Middlesex. (See here.)
  • Jacob Still Fipps, evidently born about 1813 in Ohio, was a carpenter. (See here.)
  • Jonathan Phipps of Guilford County, North Carolina, born about 1818, was a carpenter. (See here.)
  • Joseph Phipps of Lincoln County, Georgia had carpenter’s tools in his estate in 1825. (See here.)
  • William Valentine Phipps, born 1829 Rush County, Indiana, was a carpenter. (See here.)
  • Thomas D. Phipps of Chester County, Pennsylvania, born 1830, was a carpenter. (See here.)
  • Thomas Phipps of Chester County, Pennsylvania, born about 1831 (perhaps same as the last person), was a carpenter. (See here.)
  • Sampson and William Phipps, perhaps around the 1830s, were responsible for whip-sawing lumber for boat building in Clay County Indiana. (See here.)
  • Samuel Phipps, born about 1835-41, was a carpenter in California. (See here.)
  • Thomas Phipps, born about 1845 in Georgia, was a house carpenter. (See here.)
  • Charles M. Phipps, born 1849 in Iowa, was a carpenter. (See here.)
  • Joshua Fipps appears to have been making axes and adzes suitable for ship carpenters on the Ohio River in 1849. (See here.)
  • Brison Phipps, born about 1863 in Indiana, was a carpenter. (See here.)
  • John Phipps, born 1868 in Ohio, was a carpenter. (See here.)
  • Samuel Phipps of Rockingham County, New Hampshire, born 1879 Leicester, England, was a carpenter. (See here.)