William Phipps Survey, Augusta County, Virginia

Another record was found at the Virginia Historical Society by the webmaster of the “A Witcher Genealogy” website. Thanks to him for providing a copy. The record is a survey for William Phipps in the William Preston collection, which is cataloged as dated 7 April 1769.

The record refers to land which, at the time, was in Augusta County, Virginia. Reference is made to Reed Creek, “a Branch of new River,” which sounds like the Reed Creek which today is in Wythe County.

The record contains a small inset map showing what is presumably Reed Creek running near the north edge of the property. The document is cataloged as dated 7 April 1769, but in actuality the year is very unclear. The last 2 digits are overwritten and smudged. The 3rd digit in particular looks as though it could easily read something other than the “6” which it has been represented as being.

William Phipps
[small inset map]
Surveyd. for [blank] 195 Acres of Land in Augusta County (being part of the Loyal Company Grant) lying on reed Creek a Branch of new River Beginning at a Hiccory & two Walnuts on the North side of the Creek opposite to the Mouth of a Gully thence down the Creek according to its Meanders 62 Poles crossing the Creek to a white Oak on a steep Bank thence

  • N46 Et34 Poles to three white Oaks on a Ridge
  • N4[8?] W5[8?] – crossing the Creek to two white Oaks
  • S[8?]5 W94 – to three white Oaks on a Ridge
  • N67 W90 – to two white Oak saplins on a Ridge
  • S43 W46 – to a white Oak & black Oak saplin
  • S13 W11[8?] – to three white Oaks on the side of a Ridge
  • S79 E127 Poles to the Beginning.

7th April 17[overwritten and smudged]

The back reads as follows:

Wm. Phips
159 Acres
Augusta

Wilson Fipps or Phipps in the Mason Family Papers

A very recent post concerned Wilson Phipps, son of Benjamin Phipps. What isn’t clear is whether this Wilson Phipps is the same individual as the Wilson Fipps who is the subject of an 1823 receipt found at the Virginia Historical Society by the webmaster of the “A Witcher Genealogy” website. Thanks to him for providing a copy of the record.

This document contains few identifying factors. The document appears to be an ordinary rThe handwritten text is faint.

After digital manipulation, the the text appears to read as follows. The “Dr.” reference is often found in old records and does not mean “doctor,” but rather debit, as opposed to credit. Expenses are listed for sugar, “Shewthread” (presumably shoe thread), “sault” (salt), coffee, and what looks like the balance of an old account.

Mr. Wilson Fipps To William Moody Dr.

  • 1823 D[ecr?] 20    to [b1a?] Sugar 15c – $9..15c
  •                                   to ballanc [sic] of old [acct?] – ..41
  •                                   to 1 ball Shewthread 25c – ..25
  •                          24    to 1 bushell Sault $1.25c – 1..25
  •                                   to 10[m?] Coffee 40c – 4..[0?]
  •                                  [horizontal line for total]
  •                                  $15..06

[notation unclear, looks like “[?]al 176” or something similar]

The library catalog at the Virginia Historical Society refers to the Mason family papers, with mention in those papers of Wilson Fipps. The papers are described as including accounts dated 1805-1863 of several individuals, including Wilson Fipps.

The Mason family collection primarily concerns correspondence from 1817-1859 and accounts dated 1819-1855 associated with John Young Mason (Wikipedia biography), his wife Mary Ann, whose maiden name was Fort, and other family members.

John Young Mason was the US Attorney General, Secretary of the Navy, and minister to France. During the time periods represented, he was living at a place called “Fortsville” (placed in quotes in the catalog description because it’s an estate name); Southampton County, Virginia; Richmond, Virginia; Washington, DC; and Paris, France.

Fortsville (Wikipedia link) still stands, and is an historic home in Sussex County. The name sounds as though it might have come from his wife’s family, the Fort family. Papers also concern John Young Mason’s father, Edmunds Mason. He lived from 1770 to 1849 and was of “Homestead” (again, presumably an estate name) in Greensville County, Virginia.

Both Sussex County and Greensville County are in extremely close proximity to the Brunswick County which was associated with Wilson Phipps of our previous discussions. Greensville County is adjacent to Brunswick County, and was formed in 1781 from Brunswick County.

Sussex County was formed in 1754 from Surry County. Wilson was a son of Benjamin Phipps, who was a son of Joseph Phipps, but another Benjamin lived in nearby Sussex County and was believed by Mrs. Howard Woodruff, in her book on this family, to have been Joseph’s brother.

It would seem likely that the Wilson Fipps of the document in the Mason family collection was the Wilson Phipps of Brunswick County, Virginia who we’ve discussed in past posts.

Winfield Phipps of Brunswick County, Virginia

Winfield Phipps of Brunswick County, Virginia is named as a son in the will of Benjamin Phipps, whose will was proven in 1845. Benjamin, in turn, was named as a son in the 1803 Brunswick County will of Joseph Phipps.

Mrs. Howard Woodruff, in her book on Joseph and his descendants, points out that Winfield appears in the 1830 census in Brunswick County with indication that he was born about 1800-1810.

Winfield was a brother of Littleton Phipps, who was extensively discussed in a recent post, and of Wilson Phipps, who was also extensively discussed in another recent post.

Mrs. Woodruff doesn’t provide much information about Winfield. A marriage abstract indicates that Winfield Phipps married Eliza M. Powell, daughter of Sarah Powell, on 27 October 1828 in Brunswick County, with bond by John Wyche, and witnessed by John R. Powell and Lucy H. Powell.

Signatures of Winfield Phipps and Wm. C. Cabiness appear in a Brunswick County, Virginia coroner’s inquisition. William C. Cabiness married Elizabeth Phipps, Winfield’s sister.

Various family members headed for the South, with Winfield’s father Benjamin seemingly being involved in both Madison County, Alabama and Brunswick County, Virginia. (We’ve noted various family members being involved in two places at once, or nearly at once, with records referring to them as being “of” one location but buying or selling land in another location). A Mississippi Supreme Court record in 1860 refers to depositions from a Winfield Phipps and others who said that during the period 1815-1826 in Virginia, they knew a certain Joseph P. Kelly. Is this the same Winfield?

A discussion post in the well-known “Searching for Saponi Town” site doesn’t seem to be entirely clear, but appears to refer to a woman named Matilda Barner who was a slave on the plantation belonging to Winfield Phipps.

The post seems to be suggesting that this Matilda was born about 1820, about 50 years later than the last documented Saponi, “on Fort Christanna land.” Her granddaughter then referred to her as an Indian. Reference is made to something called the “Travis family history book.”

Various indications suggest that the Phipps or Phips and Reeves or Rives families may have possibly intermarried or least crossed paths with the Saponi or some other Virginia tribe at some point. The readily available Powellton USGS quadrangle topo map shows the site of Fort Christanna as situated on the Meherrin River. This was within walking distance from land associated with the Phipps or Phips family in Brunswick County.

Fort Christanna was in operation from about 1714 to 1718, and provided refuge and education for tribes living in the area. Even after the fort shut down, Saponi and Tutelo continued to live at the site for a number of years afterward.

Much later, an 1863 Brunswick County chancery case refers to children of Winfield Phipps “etc.” as plaintiffs against William Phipps “etc.”

We are again grateful to the webmaster of “A Witcher Genealogy” for copies of two Brunswick County deed records pertaining to Winfield Phipps. These are transcribed below.

Deed, 1822

[in margin:]

Phipps
to
Governor.

[body of text:]

Know all Men by these Presents that we Winfield Phipps and Benjamin Phipps & John Phipps are held and firmly bound unto Thomas M Randolph Governor of the [Comwlth? (presumably abbreviation for Commonwealth)] of Virginia in the just & full sum of fifteen hundred dollars To which payment well and truly to be made to the said Governor and his successors we bind ourselves our heirs Exors. [i.e. executors] and Admrs. [i.e. administrators] Jointly and Severally firmly by these presents sealed with our seals and dated this 26th day of August 1822.

The Condition of the above obligation is such that whereas the above bound Winfield Phipps hath been appointed a Constable for the County of Brunswick by the Court of said County for the term of two years next ensuing, If therefore the said Winfield Phipps shall well and truly discharge the said office of Constable in the County aforesaid during his Continuance in Office, then the above obligation to be Void or also to remain in full force and 
Virtue. [signed:]

Winfield Phipps (seal)
John Phipps (seal)
Benjamin Phipps (seal)

Signed Sealed and acknowledged.
In presence of
[blank]

Brunswick County Court August 26th 1832.
This Bond was acknowledged by the Obligers thereto to be their Act and Deed and Ordered to be Recorded.

Teste [signed:]
R Turnbull [cBC.? (presumably clerk, Brunswick County)]

Examd. [i.e. Examined]

Deed, 1825

[in margin:]

Phipps
to
Governor

[body of text:]

Know all Men by these Presents that we Winfield Phipps John Phipps and Benjamin Phipps are held and firmly bound unto James Pleasants Jr Esqr Governor or Chief Magistrate of the Commonwealth of Virginia for the time being & his Successors in the just & full Sum of five thousand Dollars, To which payment well & truly to be made we bind our selves our heirs Exors. [i.e. executors] & admrs [i.e. administrators] Jointly & severally firmly by these presents sealed with our seals & dated the 25th day of July 1825.

The Condition of the above obligation is such that whereas the above bound Winfield Phipps hath been appointed a Constable for the County of Brunswick by the Court of the said County to serve for the term of two years If therefore the said Winfield Phipps shall well & truly discharge the duties of said office of Constable in the County of Brunswick aforesaid for the term of two years or so long as he shall Continue in Office then the above obligation to be void or else to remain in full face [sic; “force” is the formulaic wording] & Virtue. [signed:]

Winfield Phipps (seal)
John Phipps (seal)
Benja. Phipps (seal)

Signed Sealed & delivered
In presence of
[blank]

Brunswick County Court July 25th 1825.
This Bond was acknowledged by the obligers thereto to be their act & deed and ordered to be recorded

Teste [signed:]
R Turnbull cBCo [presumably clerk, Brunswick County]

Exd. [i.e. Examined]

Goochland County, Virginia “ffipps” Orphans

Past posts have noted the presence of two “Fipps” orphans, Joseph and Benjamin, in Goochland County, Virginia court records dated 1742. They were discussed in the following posts, for instance:

Those posts were dependent on published transcripts or abstracts of the relevant court records. Now thanks once again to the webmaster of the “A Witcher Genealogy” website, we have access to a copy of an actual handwritten record.

Surprisingly the record in which the orphans are bound uses the archaic initial double-f spelling. Online genealogy sources differ among themselves as to what this means, or if it means anything at all.

Some claim that the use of an initial double-f (lower case at the beginning of the name) signifies Welsh origins. That could have been the case at times, but other sources refer to Scottish origins, while still others point to simply stylistic preferences.

The claim is made that use of a capital F at the start of a surname came in during the Elizabethan era (1558-1603). Some preferred to continue the use of a double-f long after, however, supposedly to signify a linkage to still older important records such as deeds and wills.

In transcribing such names, some believe the double-f should be retained. Still others assert that this should simply be rendered as “F.” In this case, use of the initial double-f appears to probably only have represented a stylistic preference on the part of the clerk or scribe.

In the page in which the orphan record occurs, the use of an initial double-f for a surname appears 3 times. A certain “Carlton ffleming” is mentioned, for instance, just above the record about the orphans.

Archaic handwriting forms seem to be preferred in this page in general. A 13-year-old “negro girl” is said to be “xiii years old,” for example, with a pronounced hook at the bottom of the final “i.”

Here, then, is the record pertaining to the orphans:

[in margin:]
Orphans to be bound

[body of text:]
Ordered that the Church Wardens of Saint James parish do bind Joseph and Benjamin ffipps unto Josiah Burton a Carpenter according to Law.

We’ve noted in the past the potential importance of the inclusion of the Burton surname here. A number of Burton associations and connections have been noted in various early Virginia contexts, including the marriage (apparently a 2nd marriage) of George Reeves of Grayson County, Virginia, father in law of Samuel Phips who died in 1854 in adjacent Ashe County, North Carolina, to a Burton.

Washington Hamilton Phipps

Washington Hamilton Phipps was a son of Mathew or Matthew Phips or Phipps and his wife Mathursa (“Mathursy”) Toliver. Washington Hamilton Phipps, as he was generally known, was called George Washington Hamilton Phipps in probate records pertaining to his father’s estate in Owen County, Indiana. He was called W.H. on his tombstone.

1835

He was born about 1836 in Indiana according to the 1850 and 1860 censuses, as well as an abstract of the 1920 census. He was born in November 1835 in Indiana according to the 1900 census. He was born in 1835 according to his tombstone photo. He was born 15 November 1835 near Bowling, Indiana according to his obituary. Bowling Green is in Clay County, and is where his father Mathew or Mathew owned a store.

About 1838

He moved with his parents to Freedom, Owen County, Indiana when he was 3, according to his obituary.

1860

The 1860 census shows him as Washington H. Phipps, age 24, living in the household of his brother Toliver L. Phipps. He was a day laborer at the time. This was on 9 July 1860 in Franklin Township, Owen County, Indiana.

1864

Washington H. Phipps was a student at the University of Indiana, from Freedom, Indiana. He was a freshman in 1864. The source for this information is Theophilus A. Wylie, Indiana University, Its History from 1820, When Founded, to 1890, Indianapolis: Wm. B. Burford, 1890, p. 440.

1865

W.H. Phipps married Louisa according to their tombstone photo. Washington H. Phipps married Louisa 22 August 1865 in Owen County, Indiana according to a guardian’s declaration and according to a marriage record. Washington H. Phipps married Louisa about 1865 according to the 1900 census.

She was born about 1837 in Indiana according to the 1880 census, December 1836 in Indiana according to the 1900 census, and 1836 according to her tombstone.

She married Silas A. Leak before marrying Washington Hamilton Phipps. She married Leak 8 December 1855 in Owen County, Indiana according to a guardian’s declaration, but 7 December 1854 in Owen County according to a marriage record.

Silas Leak died 9 September 1863 at or near Jackson, Mississippi according to a guardian’s declaration. Jackson is in Hinds County. He had served in the Civil War as a private in Company H, 97th Regiment Indiana Volunteers, according to the same guardian’s declaration.

A daughter of Silas and Louisa (Morris) Leak was Mary A. Leak. Mary was born 24 May 1861 according to the guardian’s declaration. According to that document, she resided with her stepfather Washington H. Phipps at Spencer, Owen County, Indiana on 24 May 1866.

Louisa died 1912 according to her tombstone. She is buried in Barnes Cemetery at Spencer, Owen County, Indiana with her husband, according to a Find A Grave page apparently verified by the inclusion of a tombstone photo.

1866

He resided in Owen County, Indiana on 24 May 1866 according to a guardian’s declaration.

From a guardian’s declaration in the Civil War Pension File of Silas A. Leak, Indiana:

Guardian’s Declaration for Minor Children’s Army Pension.
State of Indiana
County of Owen ss:

On this 24th day of May A. D., one thousand eight hundred and sixty six personally appeared before me, Inman H. Fowles Clerk of the Circuit Court within and for the County and State aforesaid Washington H. Phipps a resident of Spencer in the County of Owen and State of Indiana aged thirty years, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth, on oath, make the following declaration, as guardian of the minor child of Silas A. Leak deceased, in order to obtain the benefit of the provisions made by the act of Congress, approved July 14, 1862, granting pensions to minor children, under sixteen years of age, of deceased officers and soldiers. That he is the Guardian of Mary A. Leak [blank space] (these being the only children of deceased, under sixteen years of age,) whose father was a private in Company “H” commanded by Captain James S. Meek in the Ninety Seventh (97) Regiment of Indiana Volunteers in the War of 1861; who died on the Ninth day of September in the year of 1863, at or near Jackson in the State of Mississippi

The widow of Silas Leak, Louisa Leak, mother of said ward, obtained a pension certificate, and drew pay to the date of her marriage.

That the mother of the child aforesaid was married to Washington H. Phipps, the applicant in this case (mother’s name Louisa Leak) on the 22nd (Twenty second) day of August 1865 and that the date of the birth of his ward, and h[er?] residence is as follows:

Mary A. Leak, born May 24th 1861 and her resident [sic; residence] is with the applicant, in Spencer Owen County Indiana

He further declares that the parents of his said ward were married at [blank] in the county of Owen State of Indiana on the 8th day of December in the year 1855, by [blank]. He also declares that neither he nor his said ward have in any manner, been engaged in or aided or abetted the rebellion in the United States. He hereby appoints David E. Beem of Spencer County of Owen State of Indiana his true and lawful Attorney, with full power of substitution to prosecute this claim for pension, and receive the certificate to be issued therefor. And that his P. O. Address is Spencer, Owen County, Indiana.

[signed:]
Washington H Phipps

For witnesses to signature of applicant, see in statement below

Also personally appeared William A. Willard and Nicholas Willard residents of Spencer County of Owen State of Indiana whom I certify to be respectable and entitled to credit, and who, being by me first duly sworn, say they were present and saw Washington H. Leak [sic; Washington H. Phipps] sign his name to the foregoing declaration and power of attorney; and they further swear that they have every reason to believe, from the appearance of the applicant, and their acquaintance with him, that he is the identical person he represents himself to be. That they have been well acquainted with Silas A. Leak deceased, and with his child the aforesaid ward of the said guardian for Five years, and know that she is all and the only child of said Silas A. Leak under sixteen years of age; and they verily believe, from their personal knowledge, that the same, age, and residence of the child is as stated by their guardian in the foregoing declaration. And further that the wife of said Silas A. Leak, (named Louisa Leak) was married to the applicant Washington H. Phipps on the 22nd (twenty second) day of August 1865; and that the said guardian, nor his said ward have not in any manner aided or abetted the rebellion in the United States; and further, that the parents of the said child aforesaid lived together as husband and wife, and were so reputed. And that they have no interest in the persecution of this claim.

[signed:]
Wm. A Willard
Nicholas Willard

Sworn to and subscribed before me, this Twenty fourth day of May A. D., 1866, and I hereby certify that I have no interest, direct or indirect, in the prosecution of this claim.

[signed:]
Inman H. Fowler clerk Owen Circuit Court of State of Indiana

1880

He is listed as Washington Phipps, farmer, in the census on 3 June 1880 in Jefferson Township, Owen County, Indiana.

From the 1880 census, Jefferson Township, Owen County Indiana, 3 June 1880, #32/32:

  • Washington Phipps, white male, 44 [born about 1836], married, farmer, born Indiana, father born Virginia, mother born North Carolina
  • Louisa Phipps, white female, 43 [born about 1837], married, keeping house, could not read and write, Indiana, Kentucky, Kentucky
  • Fayetta M. Phipps, white female, 14 [born about 1866], daughter, at home, attended school within census year, Indiana, Indiana, Indiana
  • Mianetta Bell Phipps, white female, 12 [born about 1868], daughter, at home, attended school within census year, Indiana, Indiana, Indiana
  • Hershal Phipps, white male, 9 [born about 1871], son, attended school within census year, Indiana, Indiana, Indiana
  • Infant Phipps, white female, 1 [born about 1879], daughter, Indiana, Indiana, Indiana

1900

He is listed as a farmer in Jefferson Township, Owen County, Indiana on 13 June 1900.

From the 1900 census, Jefferson Township, Owen County, Indiana, 13 June 1900, #119/120:

  • Washington H. Phipps, head, white male, born November 1835, age 64, married 35 years [married about 1865], born Indiana, father born Ireland, mother born Indiana, farmer, 0 months unemployed, owned farm free of mortgage, number of farm schedule 111
  • Louisa Phipps, wife, white female, December 1836, age 63, married 35 years, mother of 10 children, 5 living, Indiana, Kentucky, Kentucky
  • Sarah F. Phipps, daughter, white female, May 1879, age 21, single, Indiana, Indiana, Indiana
  • Carie Phipps, son, white male, August 1876, age 23, single, farmer, Indiana, Indiana, Indiana, 0 mos. unemployed

1920

A census abstract shows Washington H. Phipps in Jefferson Township, Owen County, Indiana, in 1820.

From the Owen County Democrat, Spencer, Owen County, Indiana, Thursday, 5 August 1920, p. 4, under “Big Rock:”

Frank Seifert and wife, Henry Beaman and mother and Mrs. Fane Beaman of Freedom motored to Dutch Bethel Sunday morning for meeting and visited in the afternoon with Wash Phipps, who is dangerously ill. He is an uncle of Mrs. Fane Beaman.

Washington Hamilton Phipps died in Owen County, Indiana on 21 August 1920. He died in 1920 according to his tombstone. He died 21 August 1920 at his home near Arney, Indiana according to his obituary. Arney is in Owen County.

He was buried in Barnes Cemetery in Spencer, Owen County, Indiana according to a Find A Grave page verified by the inclusion of a tombstone photo.

From:The Owen County Democrat, Thursday, 2 September 1920, p. 4:

WASHINGTON H. PHIPPS

Washington H. Phipps was born in Bowling Green, Indiana, November 15, 1835, and died at his home near Arney, Indiana, August 21, 1920, age 84 years, 11 months and 6 days. At the age of three year [sic; years], he moved with his parents to Freedom where his life has been spent in and near that plae [sic; place]. His early education was received at the rural school and later he attended Indiana University three years. He taught in the public schools in the county for six years. He was united in marriage to Louise Seak [sic; Leak] in 1865. To this union were born six children, Homer dying at the age of two years, those living are Mrs Etta Mitten. of Coal City, Mrs Belle Phipps of Pana, Ill, Herschel of Canton, South Dakota, Carey of Patricksburg and Mrs. Frances Rawley of Arney; also nineteen grandchildren and three great grandchildren.

His wife died eight years ago, since then he has lived alone at the old homestead. His children were all with him during his last illness of almost five weeks and did all that could be done to relieve his suffering. He was laid to rest in the Barnes cemetery near Rattlesnake Station, beside his wife who preceded him in death.

A tombstone transcription follows:

LOUISA PHIPPS
1836-1912

W.H. PHIPPS
1835-1920

CHILDREN OF WASHINGTON HAMILTON AND LOUISA PHIPPS:

1 – Homer Phipps

Homer died when two years old, according to his father’s obituary.

2 – Fayette M. (“Etta”) Phipps

She is called Fayetta M. Phipps in the 1880 census, Fayette M. in her 1902 marriage, and Etta in the obituary of her father. Her parents were Washington Phipps and Louisa according to the 1880 census and Washington H. Phipps and Louisa Seak (error for Leak) according to Washington’s obituary.

She was born about 1866 in Indiana according to the 1880 census, or about 1874 in Owen County, Indiana according to her 1902 marriage record.

Etta married a MItten and lived at Coal City on 2 September 1920, according to her father’s obituary. Her marriage record calls her Fayette M. Phipps. That record shows that she married George O. Mitten in 1902.

From Owen County, Indiana Marriage Book H22, p. 16, line 12:

  • Full name of groom: Geo. O. Mitten
  • Place of residence of groom: Coal City
  • Age next birthday: 31 [born about 1871]
  • Color: W
  • Occupation: Merchant
  • Place of birth: Owen Co.
  • Father’s name: Nimrod Mitten
  • Mother’s maiden name: Susan Beck
  • No. groom’s marriage: 1
  • Full name of bride (maiden name, if a widow): Fayette M. Phipps
  • Place of residence: Owen Co.
  • Age next birthday: 28 [born about 1874]
  • Color: W
  • Place of birth: Owen Co.
  • Father’s name: Washington H. Phipps
  • Mother’s maiden name: Louisa Morris
  • No. bride’s marriage: 1
  • Place of marriage: Owen Co.
  • By whom married: F. B. Williams
  • Date of marriage: Nov. 19, 1902
  • Record no.: [blank]

At the time of her father’s death, according to his obituary, she was living at Coal City. Coal City is in Owen County, and this was on 2 September 1920.

Her husband George O. Mitten was born about 1871 in Owen County, Indiana according to the 1902 marriage record. At the time of their marriage, he was a merchant and residing at Coal City, according to that record. Coal City is in Owen County.

According to the same record, George O. Mitten was a son of Nmrod Mitten and Nimrod’s wife Susan Beck. Nimrod was born about 1820 in Maryland according to the 1860 census. That census shows him on 2 August 1860 as Nimrod Mitten, farmer, in Jefferson Township, Owen County, Indiana.

Susan Beck is called Susana in the 1860 census and Susan Beck in the 1902 marriage record of son George to Fayette. Susan was born about 1823 in Pennsylvania according to the 1860 census.

3 – Minetta Belle (“Belle”) Phipps

She was called Mianetta Bell in the 1880 census and Mrs. Belle Phipps in her father’s obituary. Secondary unconfirmed sources call her Minetta Bell or Minetta Belle.

Her parents were Washington Phipps and Louisa according to the 1880 census, or Washington H. Phipps and Louisa Seak (error for Leak) according to Washington’s obituary.

She was born about 1868 in Indiana according to the 1880 census.

On 29 March 1899, she married her first cousin James Denver Phipps, son of Jesse James Madison Phipps (called James Madison Phipps) and Amanda C. Abrell.

Presumably because they were first cousins, they married at Henderson, Henderson County, Kentucky. James D. Phipps married Miss Belle Phipps in 1899 at Henderson, Kentucky according to her obituary.

On 2 September 1920, at her father’s death, she was living at Pana, Christian County, Illinois, according to her father’s obituary.

Belle married a Phipps and lived at Pana, Illinois on 2 September 1920, according to her father’s obituary.

4 – Herschel Phipps

Herschel lived at Canton, South Dakota on 2 September 1920, according to the obituary of his father. Canton, is in Lincoln County. He married Ollie Harrington or Harington.

From marriage license record, Owen County, Indiana:

STATE OF INDIANA,
OWEN COUNTY,
SS:

Before Clerk of the Circuit Court, in and for said County and State, personally came Aaron Long, of lawful age, who, being duly sworn, upon his oath says he resides in the County of Owen, aforesaid; that he is acquainted with the parties for whom application is made for a MARRIAGE LICENSE.

Deponent says he knows Herschel Phipps to be over the age of twenty-one years, and that Ollie Harrington is over eighteen years of age, and that she has been a resident of said county for the last thirty days, and further deponent saith not.

[signed:]
Aaron Long (SEAL)

Subscribed and sworn to before me, this 15 day of March, 1882 [signed:]
[H.?] S. Johnson Clerk.

From marriage record, Owen County, Indiana:

Herschel Phipps
TO
Ollie Harington
SS

Be it Remembered, That on this 15. day of March, 1892, the following Marriage License was issued, to-wit:

STATE OF INDIANA, OWEN COUNTY, SS:

TO ANY PERSON BY LAW EMPOWERED TO SOLEMNIZE MARRIAGES, GREETING:

You are hereby authorized to join together as HUSBAND AND WIFE, Herschel Phipps and Ollie Harington and this shall be your warrant for the same.

WITNESS, my hand and seal of office, at Spencer, this 15 day of March, A. D. 1892 [signed:]
Winfield S. Johnson
Clerk of the Owen Circuit Court

Be it further remembered that on this 18″ day of March, 1892, the following certificate was filed in my office, to-wit:

STATE OF INDIANA, OWEN COUNTY, SS:

I CERTIFY That on the 17″ day of March, 1892 Herschel Phipps and Ollie Harington were joined together as Husband and Wife, by me. [signed:]

Ransom B. Tolliver

From the 1920 census, Washington Township, Daviess County, Indiana, 29 January 1920, sheet 10B, #210/212:

  • Herschel M. Phipps, head, renting, male, white, 49 [born about 1871], married, born Indiana, his father born Indiana, his mother born Indiana, farmer, general farm, working on own account
  • Ollie Phipps, wife, female, white, 45 [born about 1775], married, Indiana, Indiana, Indiana
  • Edith Dillon, daughter, female, white, 19 [born about 1901], married, Indiana, Indiana, Indiana
  • George Dillon, son in law, male, white, 21 [born about 1899], married, Indiana, Indiana, Indiana

5 – Cary or Carey Phipps

His name is spelled Cary Phipps on his tombstone, but Carey Phipps in his father’s obituary and in his own obituary. He was called Carie in the 1900 census.

He was born 1876 and died 1957 according to his tombstone. He shares a tombstone with his wife Florence M. Phipps, as her name appears there, with the inscription indicating that she lived from 1877 to 1956.

Carey (as spelled in his father’s obituary) Phipps lived at Patricksburg on 2 September 1920, according to the obituary of his father. According to Carey’s own obituary, he was a son of Washington Phipps.

An obituary titled “Carey Phipps, Owen Native, Buried Wednesday,” appears in an obituary clippings file in the public library in Spencer, Owen County, Indiana. That obituary says that he was born in Owen County and died at about 80. He died at Rantoul, Illinois, according to the obituary. Rantoul is in Champaign County.

According to the same source, his wife Florence (Biddle) Phipps had died the previous year. The obituary rather cryptically states that her body was “returned to this county” for burial in Owen County, Indiana. Perhaps the meaning intended was that the couple had been living at Rantoul, Illinois.

According to his obituary, Carey Phipps, with a date which is partly cut off in a digital scan but which appears to have been some time in 1957, Carey died “Sunday,” and the funeral was “Wednesday.”

He was buried in the Christian Cemetery, presumably in Owen County, after a funeral in the Patricksburg Methodist Church, according to his obituary. A page in Find A Grave with a tombstone photo calls this cemetery Lutheran Cemetery and says that it’s in Patricksburg in Owen County. One wouldn’t think that a cemetery would change from a Christian (the denomination, presumably) cemetery, with a Methodist funeral, to a Lutheran cemetery.

The Find A Grave page claims that his middle initial was P., but this does not appear in the tombstone inscription and no source is provided. That page also claims that he was born 16 August 1876 and died 24 June 1957, but again no source is indicated.

Find A Grave claims which go beyond tombstone inscriptions are usually unsourced, and contain frequent errors. He could not have died on 24 June 1957 unless his obituary is wrong. The obituary states that he died on a Sunday, and 24 June 1957 was on a Monday.

Survivors are listed in the obituary, including 4 children:

  • Mrs. Gladys Bielfield, resided Champaign, Illinois
  • Homer Phipps, resided Indianapolis
  • Harold Phipps, resided Rantoul, Illinois
  • Roscoe Phipps, resided int the state of Washington

Speaking to old-timers who were sitting on the bench outside the store at Freedom, Owen County, Indiana in 1992 elicited the comment from one of them, “I remember Cary Phipps.”

6 – Frances Phipps

She married a Rawley and lived at Arney on 2 September 1920, according to her father’s obituary.

According to her tombstone, which calls her Frances P. Rawley, she was born 1879 and died 1962. She is buried in McKee Cemetery in Owen County, Indiana according to a Find A Grave page which includes a tombstone photo. That page claims that her husband was Mark Ross Rawley, but with no tombstone photo and no sources cited.

From the 1910 census, Jefferson Township, Owen County, Indiana, 18 April 1910, sheet 1A, 6/6:

  • Mark Rawley, male, white, 34 [born about 1876], in 1st marriage, married 8 years [married about 1902], born Indiana, his father born Indiana, his mother born Ohio, farmer, general farm, working on own account, owned mortgaged farm
  • Frances Rawley, female, white, 30 [born about 1880], in 1st marriage, married 8 years, Indiana, Indiana, Indiana
  • Loran Rawley, son, male, white, 7 [born about 1903], single, Indiana, Indiana, Indiana
  • Corene Rawley, daughter, female, white, 6 [or 5?]/12, single, Indiana, Indiana, Indiana

5 – John Andrew Phipps

He has been discussed extensively in a past post.

6 – Doctor Matthew Phipps

This individual’s name has caused a great deal of confusion on the part of genealogists. He was not the only 19th century individual to be named “Doctor.” He was not a medical doctor, but was called “Doctor” even when he was a young child. Not surprisingly, once he reached adulthood he went by the name Matthew.

In the 1850 census, at the age of 12, he is called Doctor M Phipps and was living in the household of his stepfather Alexander McBride and his mother. In the 1860 census, at the age of 21, he is called Doctor M Phipp and was living in the Alexander McBride household (his stepfather).

From marriage record, Owen County, Indiana:

Doctor M. Phipps
TO
Rachel E Stine
SS.

Be it Remembered, That on this 25 day of June 1864, the following Marriage License was issued, to-wit:

Indiana, to-wit: Owen County, ss.
TO ALL WHO SHALL SEE THESE PRESENTS, GREETING:

Know ye, that any person empowered by law to solemnize marriages, is hereby authorized to join together as Husband and Wife, Doctor M. Phipps and Rachel E. Stines and for so doing this shall be his sufficient authority.

IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, Inman H Fowler, Clerk of the Owen Circuit Court, hereunto subscribe my name, and affix the seal of said Court, at Spencer, this 25 day of June, 1864 [signed:]
I. H. Fowler clk

Be it further remembered, that on this 25 day of June 1864, the following certificate was filed in my office, to-wit:

Indiana, to-wit: OwenCounty, ss.

This certifies that I joined in marriage as husband and wife, Doctor M. Phipps and Rachel E. Stines, on the 25 day of June, 1864 [signed:]
George W. Babbs, J. P.

From records of Tombstones of Deceased Union Veterans:

Phipps, Doctor M.,
Pvt. Co. I, 148th Regt. Ind. INf’y,
Cemetery: Leach [or Leash?] at or near Freedom, Ind.
Grave: [blank]
Date of death: March 19, 1877.
Headstone supplied by
W. H. Gross, Lee, Mass
CONTRACT FEB’Y 4, 1896

Wilson Phipps, Son of Benjamin Phipps

Mrs. Howard Woodruff, in her book on Joseph Phipps and family, refers to two different early Virginia individuals both named Benjamin Phipps. One was of Brunswick County, Virginia, a son of Joseph of Brunswick County, Virginia, while the other was of nearby Sussex County, Virginia.

She believed that the latter Benjamin was a brother of Joseph. In other words, one Benjamin was a son of Joseph, while the other, she thought, was probably a brother of Joseph.

The information in Mrs. Woodruff’s manuscript or book regarding the Benjamin who was a son of Joseph seems a bit unclear: She seems to have him migrating from Brunswick County, Virginia to Madison County, Alabama, leaving a will in Madison County, Alabama, but then dying in Brunswick County, Virginia. Is that what really happened? If so, did he move to Alabama and then move back shortly before he died?

BENJAMIN PHIPPS, SON OF JOSEPH PHIPPS

About 1762

According to Mrs. Howard Woodruff, Benjamin was born about 1762. She points out that he was 21 or older in 1783, citing a personal property tax list (presumably in Brunswick County, Virginia) where, she says, he was living in the household of Joseph Phipps. If so, was he actually named in that record?

1791

Benjamin Phipps married Lucy Tuberfield 16 February 1791 in Brunswick County, Virginia, according to Mrs. Woodruff and other sources, with Richardson Phipps as a witness.

1820

He would appear to be the Benjamin listed below in the 1820 census in Brunswick County, Virginia. Also listed on the same page was John Phipps, who would have been of the right age to have been the one who was Benjamin’s brother, and William Phipps. William would have been of the right age to have been the one who was Benjamin’s son, as listed by Mrs. Woodruff.

From the 1820 census, Brunswick County, Virginia:

(Note: The following all appear on the same page, but not in immediate succession. The census is partly alphabetized, in that “P” surnames appear together.)

Benjamin Phipps . . .
Free white males:
1 under 10
1 10-16
2 16-18
4 16-26
1 45+ [born about 1775 or earlier]
Free white females:
3 16-26
1 45+ [born about 1775 or earlier]

William Phipps . . .
Free white males:
1 16-26 [born about 1794-1804]
Free white females:
[None listed]

John Phipps
Free white males:
1 16-26
1 45+ [born about 1775 or earlier]
Free white females:
1 under 10
1 45+ [born about 1775 or earlier]

Mrs. Woodruff says that after marrying Lucy, Benjamin appears in early tax lists and the 1810 and 1820 censuses in Brunswick County. She says that he then moved to Madison County, Alabama, where he appears in records by 1824.

1824

Mrs. Woodruff refers to a lawsuit brought by Benjamin Phipps in Madison County, Alabama against Claxton Lightfoot. The Lightfoot name is one which has been noted in Phipps or Fips, etc. research at other times in Virginia.

The synopsis of the case as presented by Mrs. Woodruff doesn’t seem entirely clear. She referred to “Original File #5017,” without elaborating. She said that Benjamin Phipps sued Lightfoot in July 1822 in Brunswick County, Virginia, but then refers to what she calls a “transcript of action brought” on 12 April 1824.

She does not state whether the 1824 record refers to a continuance or an appeal. Mrs. Woodruff then states that what she calls a “fine” of $631 was “paid in full.” Perhaps checking original records would make this clearer.

According to unsourced online claims, Claxton Lightfoot was a son of a Lightfoot who married Mary (“Polly”) Harris. Various Harris connections have been noted in past blog posts involving the Phipps or Phips etc. family in early Virginia.

1844-1845

The death of this Benjamin Phipps is discussed in Mrs. Howard Woodruff’s book but, again, doesn’t seem entirely clear. She refers to him as a “citizen” of Brunswick County, Virginia when he died, “leaving a will.” Earlier, however, she said that the will was left not in Brunswick County, Virginia, but in Madison County, Alabama.

She refers to this will as having been probated in February of 1845 and naming several children:

  • Marsha G. Phipps (Mrs. Woodruff consistently called her Marsha, but the name was clearly Martha)
  • William Phipps
  • Williamson Phipps
  • Elizabeth Cabaness
  • Mary Houk
  • James N. Phipps
  • Winfield Phipps

These are named, she said, in addition to his granddaughters who were children of Wilson Phipps. (Presumably Wilson had died by this time.)

Why he died as a “citizen,” whatever that means, of Brunswick County, Virginia after migrating to Madison County, Alabama is unclear. So is the matter of why he would have died in Brunswick County, Virginia if he had already moved to Madison County, Alabama.

Nevertheless, he would seem likely to have been the Benjamin Phipps whose death was reported in a Virginia newspaper, with the important note that Alabama newspapers should “please copy.”

Mrs. Woodruff believed that he had died in 1844, based on his will. The newspaper death notice, however, states that he died 28 January 1845, assuming this is the same individual.

From the Richmond Enquirer, Richmond, Virginia, 11 February 1845, p. 3:

DIED.

Died, at his residence in the county of Brunswick, Va., on the 28th of January 1845, Mr. BENJAMIN PHIPPS, aged 83 years, 11 months, and 3 days, leaving eight children and many friends and acquaintances to lament their loss. Mr. Phipps was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, and always manifested a lively interest for the perpetuation of the liberties which his patriotism and valor aided to establish. Peace to his ashes!

The Mississippi, Georgia, and Alabama papers will please copy.

WILSON PHIPPS AS SON OF BENJAMIN PHIPPS

According to Mrs. Howard Woodruff, Wilson Phipps is mentioned in the will of his father Joseph Phipps as deceased. According to the family Bible, he was born 29 March 1792.

1818

Wilson Phipps is the subject of yet another Brunswick County, Virginia “tripartite” indenture, dated 1818. The agreement also names William Phipps and John Phipps.

These would seem likely to be the William Phipps and John Phipps who appeared with Benjamin Phipps on the same page in the 1820 census in Brunswick County, Virginia, as noted above. Again, William would appear to have been the one who was Benjamin’s son, and John the one who was Benjamin’s brother, based on their ages as represented in the census.

The following record was found by the webmaster of “A Witcher Genealogy.” Thanks again to him for sharing this with us. In the record below, John Wyche (apparently a form of the same surname) recurs once again.

George B. Woodruff as referred to below would presumably be the person of that name who married Sally Manning. Sally Manning was a daughter of Joel Manning and his wife who, as Mrs. Howard Woodruff points out in her book on Joseph Phipps, was a Phipps alluded to indirectly in Joseph Phipps’s will but not named in that source, who left Manning grandchildren.

The document below also refers to R.D. Woolsey. Abner Woolsey married Mary Phipps, daughter of Joseph Phipps. Mary (Phipps) Woolsey was a sister of Benjamin Phipps, Wilson Phipps’ father. So who was R.D. Woolsey?

It would seem likely that R.D. Woolsey was the Richard D. Woolsey referred to in a past post.

There he was mentioned as one of the administrators of the estate of Abner Woolsey in an 1845 Brunswick County summons. The summons also refers to various other close family members (it would make this post too long to identify all of them), as well as Richard H.H. Wallon (or Walton?), executor.

This last individual is also named in the record below, and he appears in other Phippscentric records. His identity is unknown at this point, however. The name recurs in handwritten records in such a way that it’s not clear whether the surname is Walton, Wallon, or Wallton.

Evidently the name is Richard H.H. Walton, however. That’s based on an article which includes his name in print in connection with a political meeting held in Brunswick County in 1842. The article is titled “The Ball Moving – Proceedings of Brunswick,” and it appeared in the Weekly Globe, published by Blair and Rives, 5 November 1842, p. 759.

Similarly, the name is purported to appear somewhere in page 3 of the Richmond Enquirer, 28 January 1841, according to OCRed text in Virginia Chronicle at the Library of Virginia. Evidently the interface is insufficient to verify this, however, without reading the entire page.

The following is the text of the record referred to earlier, dated 1818 in Brunswick County, Virginia:

[in margin:]

Phipps
to
Phipps

[body of text:]

This Indenture Tripartite made & entered into this sixth day of July Eighteen hundred & eighteen between Wilson Phipps of the first part John Phipps of the second part & William Phipps of the third part all of the County of Brunswick Witnesseth that whereas the said John Phipps has become and is now security for the said Wilson Phipps to William Woolsey in a joint bond or note Conditioned for the payment of eighty dollars or thereabouts in or about the year 1816 and the said Wilson Phipps being willing and desirous to secure & save free from

[page break – in margin: “321”]

loss damage & injury the said John Phipps for having become his security as aforesaid For that purpose & for & in the further consideration of one dollar by the said William Phipps to the said Wilson Phipps before the sealing & delivery of these presents in hand paid the receipt whereof is hereby Acknowled [sic; acknowledged] he the said Wilson Phipps hath & by these presents doth give grant bargain sell alien make over & confirm unto the said William Phipps the following property to wit two feather beds with all their furniture & apparatus one gun two painted pine Chest [sic; said two, but Chest in the singular] one walnut Table two pine Tables one Cupboard with all tea & Table furnature & [Wants?] of the kitchen furniture consisting of one pot & an [Oven?] Gridiron [? (looks like “bread”)] [hoe?] a set of shoe Makers Tools One Cow and Calf & ten head of hogs four seting [sic] chairs one Press now in the said John’s Possession one [?] watch one saddle & Bridle by the said William Phipps his heirs or Assigns to be taken and sold & disposed of as his own & sole property free from the Claim or demand of him the Wilson Phipps & of all & any other person or persons whatsoever & the [said?] Wilson Phipps for himself & his heirs doth by these presents covenant & Agree with the said William Phipps his heirs Executors his heirs Executors [sic; words repeated] Administrators or Assigns that he will forever warrant & defend the legal & equitable right title use & [possession?] to of & in the whole & any of the said described & above mentioned property to him the said William Phipps his heirs or assigns upon Trust however & it is fully understood & Agreed by and between every & all of the above contracting parties that at any time hereafter & whenever the [said?] William Woolsey or John Phipps or the said Wilson Phipps or either of them or either of their heirs Exors. [i.e. executors] Admrs. [i.e. administrators] shall require the payment of the debt first above described or shall require the said William Phipps his heirs Exors. Admrs. or Assigns he the said William Phipps his heirs Executors Administrators or assigns when thereto required by either the said William Woolsey John Phipps or Wilson Phipps shall advertise at three of the most convenient public places in the neighbourhood of Powelton [may be written as “Powilton”] at least two days previous a day & place when& where he shall & may proceed to sell to the highest bidder for ready Money so much or the whole of the said Mentioned property as shall be sufficient to pay the said debt interest & Cost & out of the proceeds of such sale proceed in the first place to pay & satisfy all costs which may attend the said sale or be consequent on the executing this Indenture & in the second place pay to the said William Woolsey his CertainAttorney his heirs Executors Administrators or Assigns the debt Interest & Costs if any now or at that time may be due on the

[page break – in margin: “322”]

bond or note of the said Wilson & John Phipps to the said William Woolsey And in the third place should any surplus remain after paying Woolsey & debt proceed to pay a debt due from the said Wilson Phipps & George B Woodruff as the said Wilson security to John Harrison which said debt at this time amounts to between thirty & forty dollars & the balance of the property or of the proceeds of the sale after paying first the debt to Woolsey & secondly the debt to Harrison he the said William Phipps is to pay or deliver over to the said Wilson Phipps his Certain Attorney his heirs Exors [i.e. executors] Administrators or assigns The whole & sole interest of this indenture being [to?] [said?] first the said John Phipps & secondly the said George B Woodruff from loss damage or injury for being security as aforesaid & soon as that is done this Indenture & all righs [sic; rights] interest matters & things by it Conveyed or in it contained or intended to be conveyed shall cease determine & be utterly null & Void to all intents & purposes the same as if it had never been executed made or entered into In witness whereof they the said Wilson Phipps John Phipps & William Phipps have hereunto set their hands & affixed their seals the day & year first above written

[signed:]
Wilson Phipps (Seal)
John Phipps (Seal)
George B Woodruff (Seal)
William his X mark Phipps (Seal)

Signed sealed & Acknowledged before [signed:]
John Wyche (as to John & Wilson)
R H H [Walton? or Wallon?]
R D Woolsey

Brunswick County Court June 23″ 1819
This Indenture Tripartite was proved by the Oath of Richard H H [Walton? or Wallon?] a witness thereto & having been before proved by the oath of John Wyche (as to Wilson & John Phipps) & by Richard [D?] Woolsey on the 25″ day of January 1819 also Witnesses thereto the same is Ordered to be Recorded

Teste [signed:]
R Turnbull C B C [i.e. Clerk Brunswick Court or something similar]

Examd [i.e. Examined]

CHILDREN OF WILSON PHIPPS

1. Mary J. Phipps

She married Nick Kidd September 1836 in Brunswick County, Virginia, and was a granddaughter of Benjamin Phipps, according to Mrs. Howard Woodruff who cites Brunswick County marriage records.

According to the 1840 census, assuming that Mary was the adult female in the household, it would appear that she was born about 1820-1825 and that Nicholas C. Kidd was born about 1800-1810.

From the 1840 census, Brunswick County, Virginia:

[The following appear on the same page:]

Winfield Phipps [son of Benjamin3]
Free white males:
1 5-10
1 30-40 [born about 1800-1810]
Free white females:
1 15-20 [born about 1820-1825]

Gilliam Pearson [married Adelaid W. Phipps, daughter of Wilson Phipps]
Free white males:
1 20-30 [born about 1810-1820]
Free white females:
1 15-20 [born about 1820-1825]

John Wyche [who is named in Phipps deed records] . . .
Free white males:
1 5-10
2 20-30 [born about 1810-1820]
2 60-70 [born about 1770-1780]
Free white females:
1 40-50 [born about 1790-1800]

Nicholas C. Kidd [married Mary J. Phipps, daughter of Wilson Phipps]
Free white males:
2 30-40 [born about 1800-1810]
Free white females:
2 under 5
2 15-20 [born about 1820-1825]

The following would appear to probably be this couple in the 1850 census. This would suggest that the family must have moved from Virginia into Tennessee, where they were living or at least visiting about 1845, and that they moved on into Arkansas by around 1848.

From the 1850 census, Cache Township, St. Francis County, Arkansas, 16 October 1850, #55/55:

  • Nicholas C [or E?] Kidd, 36 [born about 1814], male, farmer, real estate $1,200, born Virginia
  • Mary J [or I?] Kidd, 28 [born about 1822], female, Virginia
  • Ann Kidd, 12 [born about 1838], female, Virginia, attended school
  • Sarah Kidd, 11 [born about 1839], female, Virginia, attended school
  • Charles Kidd, 8 [born about 1842], male, Virginia
  • Virginia Kidd, 5 [born about 1845], female, Tennessee
  • Josephine Kidd, 2 [born about 1848], female, Arkansas
  • James W Kidd, 22 [born about 1828], male, Virginia

2. Adelaid W. Phipps

She married Gillam Pearson in Brunswick County, Virginia, and was a granddaughter of Benjamin Phipps, according to Mrs. Howard Woodruff who cites Brunswick County marriage records.

From the 1840 census, Brunswick County, Virginia:

[The following appear on the same page:]

Winfield Phipps [son of Benjamin3]
Free white males:
1 5-10
1 30-40 [born about 1800-1810]
Free white females:
1 15-20 [born about 1820-1825]

Gilliam Pearson [married Adelaid W. Phipps, daughter of Wilson Phipps]
Free white males:
1 20-30 [born about 1810-1820]
Free white females:
1 15-20 [born about 1820-1825]

John Wyche [who is named in Phipps deed records] . . .
Free white males:
1 5-10
2 20-30 [born about 1810-1820]
2 60-70 [born about 1770-1780]
Free white females:
1 40-50 [born about 1790-1800]

Nicholas C. Kidd [married Mary J. Phipps, daughter of Wilson Phipps]
Free white males:
2 30-40 [born about 1800-1810]
Free white females:
2 under 5
2 15-20 [born about 1820-1825]

Littleton Phipps: Virginia to Georgia

Littleton (“Litt”) Phipps was a son of Benjamin Phipps who was, in turn, a son of Joseph Phipps of Brunswick County, Virginia who married Sarah Williams. Mrs. Howard Woodruff, in her book on The Descendants of Joseph Phipps, says that Littleton Phipps “was added to the transcript” of his father’s will, but without making this clear.

1820

Mrs. Woodruff notes that the 1820 census in Brunswick County, Virginia referred to a son in the household of Benjamin Phipps who was born 1810-1820, and she believed that this was Littleton.

1830

A record as abstracted in a 1985 issue of Southwest Virginian refers to an individual named Littleton in 1830 under “Removals from Delinquent Militia Fine Lists” pertaining to Southampton County, Virginia, The listing for Littleton Phipps there is followed by the notation “Brunswick.” This seems to evidently suggest that he moved from Southampton to Brunswick. The counties are extremely close together.

1840

Other family members migrated to Baker County, Georgia, and Littleton appears there in the 1840 census. He is said to have moved to Georgia from Virginia sometime around the early 1840s. If this is him, however, then he moved there by 1840.

From the 1840 census, Albany District, Baker County, Georgia:

Littleton Fips
Free white males:
1 30-40 [born about 1800-1810]

1848

As far as Littleton moving to Georgia by 1840 is concerned, however, an index listing at the Library of Virginia for an 1848 Brunswick County chancery case refers to R.H.H. Wallton as the plaintiff and Littleton Phipps et al. as the defendant.

Cabiness is another surname mentioned in those records. Littleton’s sister Elizabeth married William C. Cabiness.

Of course, it still would have been possible, however, that Littleton had moved on to Georgia, or there could have been two persons named Littleton.

Additionally, the name Walton (compare R.H.H. Wallton in the chancery case) appears in connection with a Phipps family in early Georgia. Perhaps it’s just coincidence, but a Buhama “Phibbs” married Timothy Walton in Lincoln County, Georgia in 1806, with her name spelled as “Phibbs” in the county record. Then in 1841 in the same county, Thomas F. “Phipps” married Rheulina Walton. Lincoln County is fairly close to Baker County.

1850

The name of Littleton “Pippes” appears in several pages of the slave schedule in the 1850 census in Baker County, Georgia. He also appears in the population schedule. There he’s shown as working as an overseer for Paul E. Tarver, a planter with real estate worth $50,000.

From the 1850 census, 1st District, Baker County, Georgia, 31 August 1850:

#195/195:

  • George W Lunsford, 28 [born about 1822], male, farmer, real estate $500, born Georgia
  • Nancy Ann Lunsford, 23 [born about 1827], female, Georgia
  • Catherine Lunsford, 1 [born about 1849], female, Georgia

#196/196:

  • Paul E. Tarver, 26 [born about 1824], male, planter, real estate $50,000, born Georgia
  • Littleton Phipps, 46 [born about 1804], male, overseer, Virginia, could not read and write
  • John Lunsford, 4 [born about 1844], male, Georgia

The connection to the Lunsfords, with a young Lunsford boy being in the same household as Littleton Phipps and more Lunsfords next door, is unknown. A web page says that according to a DAR line, the father of Paul E. Tarver, the individual for whom Littleton Phipps was acting as overseer, was Hartwell Hill Tarver.

Connections to the Hartwell or Heartwell family, from whom the given name was doubtless derived, have been noted elsewhere. Hartwell Hill Tarver, according to the web page, was born in 1791 in Brunswick County, Virginia, the same location where Littleton Phipps was from. A photo of a rather elaborate tombstone for Paul E. Tarver appears in Find A Grave. He is said to be buried in Dougherty County, Georgia.

1860

He was presumably the “L Phipps” listed in the 1860 census in Baker County, Georgia. No one else was with him in the household.

From the 1860 census, Newtin (Newton) District, Baker County, Georgia, with post office at Newtin (Newton), 7 July 1860, p. 105, #147/147:

  • L Phipps, 50 [born about 1810], male, [race blank, signifying white], farmer, real estate $2,000, personal estate $14,000, born Virginia

1870

The 1870 census shows him as living there and as having been born in Virginia. Although Littleton Phipps was white according to the census, his household is followed by two other households containing mulatto families named “Phipps” and “Phipcs.” Littleton is said to have fathered several mulatto children.

A descendant noted in a comment in this blog that when Littleton died, there was an effort to keep him from being buried with his mulatto family members.

If this is him below, in the 1870 census, then who was Cooper Phipps, a contemporary?

From the 1870 census, Baker County, Georgia, with post office at Newton, 10 June 1870, p. 35:

#323/318:

  • Littleton Phipps, 64 [born about 1806], male, white, farmer, real estate $2,500, personal estate $1,000, born Virginia, could not read or write
  • Cooper Phipps, 58 [born about 1812], male, white, farmer, Virginia

#324/319:

  • Many [or Marry?] Phipps, 55 [born about 1815], female, mulatto, house keeper, born Maryland, could not read or write
  • Ha[rie?]tt Phipps, 27 [born about 1843], female, mulatto, at home, Georgia, could not read or write
  • Thomas Phipps, 25 [born about 1845], male, mulatto, house carpenter, real estate [blank], personal estate $250, Georgia
  • Richard Phipps, 23 [born about 1847], male, mulatto, farm laborer, Georgia, could not read or write

#325/320:

  • George Phipcs, 21 [born about 1849], male, mulatto, farm laborer, real estate [blank], personal estate $100, Georgia, could not read or write
  • Joseph Phipcs, 20 [born about 1850], male, mulatto, farm laborer, Georgia, could not read or write
  • Henry Phipcs, 18 [born about 1852], male, mulatto, farm laborer, Georgia, could not read or write
  • Rilla Phipcs, 15 [born about 1855], female, mulatto, at home, Georgia, could not read or write
  • Mary J Phipcs, 13 [born about 1857], female, mulatto, at home, Georgia, could not read or write

Note that the George Phipps listed above, born about 1849, would appear to be the individual referred to in a Georgia death certificate as George Phipps, born about 1848 in Baker County, Georgia. His parents are listed on the certificate as “Litt Phipps,” birthplace unknown, and “Mary Phipps,” birthplace unknown.

The “Many” or “Marry” Phipps living next door to Littleton in the census above would appear to be the woman who fathered at least some of his children. If so, having her live next door might have been a way to deal with local racial taboos, and he would not have been the only 19th century person to do so in this manner.

Henry and George, both listed above, were clearly sons of Littleton, and the same can probably be assumed of the others in the 3rd household.

1874

A legal notice appearing in The Georgia Telegraph, published at Macon, Georgia on Tuesday, 14 July 1874, p. 3, listed sheriff’s sales in Baker County, Georgia. That ad indicated that lots 114 and 128 in the 8th district of Baker County, which had belonged to Littleton Phipps, were to be sold. This was to satisfy 3 “fi fas” against Littleton Phipps.

The term “fi fa” (sometimes “fi. fa.”) is an abbreviation for fieri facias. This is writ of execution after a judgment in a legal matter. Frequently this meant that the sheriff was ordered to sell property in order to satisfy a debt.

In this case, the sheriff had 3 such orders “in my hands,” as he put it. One was to satisfy R.T. Lyon, and the other 2 were to satisfy Eubanks Pompkins and H.I. Cook & Son.

Littleton Phipps or Fips of Baker County, Georgia appears to have died there in either 1874 or 1875.

1875

He is mentioned as deceased in a newspaper legal notice published on 26 January 1875 in The Georgia Telegraph, Macon, Georgia. James P. Broadaway, referred to as an official “Ordinary” of Baker County, advertised that he had become aware that the estate of Littleton Phipps, “late of said county, deceased,” was “unrepresented.”

Broadaway was therefore advertising that relatives and creditors should present themselves by the 1st Monday in March to show why the county should not appoint someone to administer the estate. This person would be the clerk of the Superior Court, “or some other fit and suitable person.”

Then on 6 April 1875, another legal notice appeared in the same paper. In this one, an administrator, B.F. Hudspeth, had been appointed. He advertised that anyone with debts to the estate of Littleton Phipps, “late of said county, deceased,” should make payment to Hudspeth.

Other sources make it clear that B.F. Hudspeth was the county court clerk. This suggests that no relatives could be found who would have been deemed suitable to administer the estate. One would have to guess that this was possibly due to racial prejudices of the time, vis-a-vis the black or mulatto identity of his other family members.

1876

Hudspeth then advertised in the same paper, beginning on 24 June 1876, that any claims against the estate should be not only presented, but presented as authenticated. Those in debt were also to make “immediate payment.” He signed the notice as “B. F. HUDSPETH, Administrator of L. Phipps.”

Then in the same paper beginning on 15 August 1876, another legal notice was repeated which announced Baker County sheriff’s sales. The ad noted that on the 1st Tuesday in September, property which had belonged to Littleton Phipps was to be sold at Newton.

This consisted of about 60 head of cattle. They were marked with a crop and hole in the left ear, and a crop and 2 splits in the right ear. This was to satisfy fi fas issued against Littleton and in favor of H.J. Cook & Son, Eubanks Tompkins, and R.S. Lyon.

1877

The Baker County sheriff ran another ad in the same paper on 8 May 1877, repeated on the 15th. He announced that he would be selling at the courthouse door in Newton land which had belonged to Littleton Phipps.

To be sold on the 1st Tuesday in June was lot 128 in the 8th district of the county. This was to satisfy a debt to B.B. Bower and E.C. Bower, administrators of J.E. Bower v. B.F. Hudspeth as Littleton’s administrator.

The sheriff then began repeating another legal notice in the same paper, beginning on 7 August 1877. This one announced that on the 1st Tuesday in September, he would sell additional property which had belonged to Littleton Phipps. To be sold were a bay mule named Pigeon, a 2-horse wagon, a sugar mill, and 2 kettles. This was to satisfy a debt to Eubanks Tompkins.

1880

Littleton’s wife or partner Mary, plus other family members, appear in the 1880 census in Baker County, Georgia. Littleton had, of course, died by this time. His son Littleton, a mulatto, does appear, however.

From the 1880 census, 8th Militia, 2nd Enumeration and District 971, Baker County, Georgia, 10 and 11 June 1880 [the Phipps family enumerated on the 11th], p. 21:

#222/222:

  • Mary Phipps, black, female, 60 [born about 1820], single, farmer, could not read or write, born Maryland, her father born “Ma,” her mother born “Ma” [presumably “Ma” meant Maryland, but this isn’t entirely clear]
  • Cindy Phipps, mulatto, female, 20 [born about 1860], daughter, single, farm laborer, Georgia, Virginia, “Ma”
  • Jane Phipps, mulatto, female, 19 [born about 1841], daughter, single, farm laborer, Georgia, Virginia, “Ma”

#223/223: [Allen Cartliff or Caitliff household]

#224/224:

  • Thomas Phipps, mulatto, male, 38 [born about 1842], single, carpenter, Georgia, Virginia, “Ma.”

#225/225:

  • Richard Phipps, mulatto, male, 36 [born about 1844], single, farmer, Georgia, Virginia, “Ma.”

#226/226:

  • George Phipps, mulatto, male, 33 [born about 1847], married, farmer, Georgia, Virginia, “Ma”
  • Louisa Phipps, black, female, 32 [born about 1848], married, keeping house, Georgia, Georgia, Georgia
  • Kizzie Ellis, black, female, 14, stepdaughter, single, farm laborer, Georgia, Georgia, Georgia
  • Littleton Phipps, black, male, 6/12 [age 6 months], born November, son, single, Georgia, Georgia, Georgia

[page break – p. 22 – 11 June 1880]

#227/227:

  • Joseph Phipps, mulatto, male, 30 [born about 1850], single, farmer, Georgia, Virginia, “Ma.”

#228/228:

  • Henry Phipps, mulatto, male, 23 [born about 1857], married, farmer, Georgia, Virginia, “Ma”
  • Francis Phipps, black, female, 21 [born about 1859], wife, married, keeping house, South Carolina, South Carolina, South Carolina
  • Mary R Phipps, black, female, 5/12 [age 5 months, born December, daughter, single, Georgia, Georgia, South Carolina
  • Lewis Bailey, black, male, 14 [born about 1866], brother in law, single,farm laborer, Georgia, Georgia, South Carolina

Children of Littleton Phipps and Mary:

1. George Phipps

George Phipps was born about 1849 in Georgia according to the 1850 census, which lists him as a mulatto, and about 1848 in Baker County, Georgia according to his death certificate. The death certificate refers to his parents as “Litt Phipps” and Mary Phipps, with the birthplaces of both unknown.

When George died in 1923, he had been living at RFD (Rural Free Delivery), Newton, Baker County, Georgia, according to his death certificate. He had lived in the community for 50 years, according to the same source.

He died 31 December 1923 at RFD, Newton, according to his death certificate. That source refers to the cause as “old age – worn completely out – Senile Colitis.” He is referred to on the certificate as a farmer and as a black male, married to Louisa Phipps. The informant on the death certificate was Litt Phipps, Jr. at Newton.

George was buried, according to the death certificate, in Phipps Cemetery in Baker County, Georgia, on 1 January 1924.

2. Joseph Phipps, Jr.

He was presumably a son of Littleton Phipps. He was born about 1850 according to the 1870 census, where he is listed as Joseph “Phipcs.” He was born about 1850 and his father born in Virginia according to the 1880 census, where he is listed as Joseph Phipps. He is listed as a mulatto in both 1870 and 1880.

The 1900 census shows him as Joseph Phipps in Baker County, Georgia, born August 1851 and married about 1881 to Katie, his wife who is shown with him. In 1870 he was listed as a mulatto, but as black in 1880. With him are his children Charlie, Joseph, Henry, Heather, Lizzie, Richard, Julia, and Champion. Champion appears in other records as Champ.

3. Litt Phipps, Jr.

LItt Phipps, Jr. is listed as the informant on the death certificate of his brother George Phipps. That certificate refers to George’s parents as Litt and Mary Phipps. On 31 December 1923, when George died, Litt Jr. was living at Newton, Georgia, according to the death certificate.

4. Henry Phipps, Jr.

Henry Phipps is said by a descendant to have been a mulatto son of Littleton Phipps. He was born in 1854 in Baker County, Georgia according to his death certificate, or about 1852 in Georgia according to the 1850 census.

Henry is referred to on his death certificate as a “Colored” and widowed male, with occupation listed as “none.” His parents are listed on his death certificate as “Littletin Phipps,” born in Virginia, and “Mary Dont Know,” birthplace unknown. The informant was Tom Phipps on Route 4 at “Newtin” (Newton), Georgia.

Henry died at 8:30 am on 2 February 1935 of chronic nephritis (which he had for 2 years), with terminal broncho pneumonia (which he had for 2 days), according to the death certificate. He was 81 according to the death certificate. He died at “Newtin” (Newton) in Baker County, Georgia.