All in Alabama

1822, CULLMAN AND WALKER COUNTIES, ALABAMA

Patsey Phipps of Jefferson County, Alabama received a patent for land in Cullman and Walker Counties in Alabama on 2 December 1822. This was for 79.49 acres.

1824, TUSCALOOSA COUNTY, ALABAMA

A patent was issued to William Phipps of Tuscaloosa County for 80 acres in that county on 27 May 1824.

1829, PERRY COUNTY, ALABAMA

John Phipps of Perry County, Alabama was issued a patent for 79.82 acres in that county on 7 July 1829.

1830, PERRY COUNTY, ALABAMA

From the 1830 census, Perry County, Alabama:

  • Jno Phips
    • Free white males:
      • 1 under 5
      • 2 5-10
      • 1 30-40 [born about 1790-1800]
    • Free white females:
      • 2 under 5
      • 1 10-15
      • 1 20-30 [born about 1800-1810]

1830, PERRY COUNTY, ALABAMA

John Phipps of Perry County, Alabama received a land patent for land in that county on 16 November 1830. This was presumably the same Jno. Phips listed there in the 1830 census.

1834, CHAMBERS COUNTY, ALABAMA

On 15 July 1834, land in Chambers County, Alabama was sold to John Phipps and Pady (Paddy) Carr by War-ker-nuf-kar of the Creek nation. The land consisted of 316.75 acres, and was sold in accordance with a treaty dated 24 March 1832.

The sale of this land is described in a later land patent, dated 30 January 1841. The land patent and Paddy Carr are discussed in detail below (see 1841, Chambers County).

1835, CHAMBERS COUNTY, ALABAMA

A Senate report from the 23rd Congress, 2nd Session, was issued 3 March 1835. This concerned public lands, reservations for the Creek, Choctaw, and Chickasaw peoples, and frauds, “if any,” involved in purchasing their lands.

One of the interrogations in an investigation into possible fraud in Chambers County, Alabama was directed to Joseph Neel (p. 19). Part of it reads as follows:

Interrogatory 4. Was the half section on which Kissy was located bought previous to the location; and by whom?
Answer. It was; and by Williams and Phipps, for the Columbus company.
Interrogatory 5. What mean you by the half section being bought previously to the location? Was this particular half section bought?
Answer. I man that a contract was made for the land. When the agreement was made she expected another half section; having, after the treaty, built a house and resided in it on the east of seventeen. She resided in it some weeks or days, I don’t recollect exactly how long.
JOSEPH NEEL.

What was meant by “the Columbus company” is not explained at that point. In 1841, however, land patents to John J. Williams and John Phipps, as discussed below, involved land which was sold by individual members of the Creek nation to Robert S. Hardaway, identified as an agent of the Columbus Land Company. That land was then reassigned to John J. Williams and John Phipps, who received the patents.

Page 6 noted that

the Commissioner of the General Land Office, in reply to a call of the Senate, made a report, by which it will be seen that all the lands sold in that year at the offices of Chocchuma and Columbus were monopolized by the speculators, generally at the minimum price of the government; and by the same report it appears that in one year the President of the United States caused to be offered at public sale, in Mississippi alone, between seven and eight millions of acres, comprising the best lands in that great cotton region.

A chart appears in Correspondence on the Subject of the Emigration of Indians, Vol. 5, Washington: Duff Green, 1835, p. 214, showing expenditures associated with the treaty of 24 March 1832 with the Creeks. This is the treaty which is referred to specifically in the land patent.

Reference is made to a voucher to Benjamin Marshall as an assignee of Paddy Carr. This was for livestock belonging to Fanny Lovitt and Joseph Carr which were “destroyed by Indians.” The amount of the voucher was $2,000.

A few lines down in the list is a voucher to “Phipps and Williams” for “goods furnished the Indians at sundry times.” The amount was $19. The same chart is reproduced in at least a couple other books. Paddy Carr is also mentioned on p. 219.

John Phipps is mentioned in a dissertation by Christopher D. Haveman, The Removal of the Creek Indians from the Southeast, 1825-1838, in a footnote on p. 190. From the context, it would appear that Phipps was an agent or sub-agent hired to encourage the Creeks to emigrate.

We’ve discussed in the past the Revolutionary War pension application file of a John Phipps who was born, according to his own testimony, in 1753 in Charles City County, Virginia. In 1832, the time of the treaty, he would have been about 79 years old, so obviously he could not have been the same John Phipps who was associated with Paddy Carr (see 1834). This earlier John, however, did say in his testimony that in 1779 he was placed as a guard to the commissioners appointed to draft a treaty with the Creek Indians in Georgia.

Regarding the later John, special agent John B. Hogan wrote a letter from Ft. Mitchell, Alabama to General George Gibson on 9 May 1835. In part of his letter, Hogan notes the following:

The Indians have become quite hostile in this part of the nation; they shot a man and woman in Chambers county, and some in this, and people are afraid to ride alone among them. One fellow threatened Major Blue that if he attempted to remove them he would kill him. I shall send down tomorrow to Barbour county and make arrangements for seeing each of the towns. I have appointed Major Phipps an assistant conductor, and authorized him to enroll the Indians residing in his vicinity, near Black’s Store . . . .

The letter can be found in Asbury Dickins and John W. Forney, eds., American State Papers: Documents, Legislative and Executive, of the Congress of the United States, Vol. 6: Military Affairs, Washington: Gales & Seaton, 1861, no. 691, p. 725.

John Phipps wrote the following letter from Chambers County, Alabama in 1835. That letter is found in House Document No. 276, 24th Congress, Letter from the Secretary of War, Transmitting Documents in Relation to Hostilities of Creek Indians, Washington: Blair & Rives, 1836, p. 328:

BLACK STORE, CHAMBERS CO, August 4.

DEAR SIR: I have, since the last time I wrote to you, been with the Cussetas and Cowetas. The Cowetas are firm; no alteration since my last. I was yesterday at a ball play where I saw James Islands and Rotcher Tustanuggee, they are making every preparation for an early start. I have appointed the first day of September, though I think it best to strike camp by the 15th, at least, as there is a number of them wishes encampment. The Cussetas I find but little alteration yet, though I think the prospect good for a part, and likely the whole. The old chief, Tuckabatchee Hadjo, talks very pleasant, but does not agree to go, yet at the same time does not object to his people’s going. If any thing new you will please inform me.

I am, sir, your obedient servant,
JOHN PHIPPS.

[To] Col. JOHN B. HOGAN, Special Agent.

Another letter to Hogan is dated 10 August of the same year, and appears in Asbury Dickins and John W. Forney, eds., American State Papers: Documents, Legislative and Executive, of the Congress of the United States, Vol. 6: Military Affairs, Washington: Gales & Seaton, 1861, p. 739:

BLACK’S STORE, August 10.

SIR: In compliance with your request, I have again gone round my district, and daily add new recruits to my list, (to the one handed you in my last,) and no doubt I will be able to make a powerful emigration. Many hundreds have disposed of all their effects, and are very impatient to come into camp. I believe I can start in fifteen or twenty days 1,000 Cowetas, and a fair prospect of several hundred Cussetas. I should be pleased to hear from you on all matters relating to our affairs, as we have heard a report that the Indians are to be carried by contract, of which they are very anxious to hear particulars. I am fearful, if that should be the case, it will retard for some time a general emigration, which I am now satisfied will take place this fall if no change in our relations takes place.

I am, sir, your obedient servant.
JOHN PHIPPS.

[To] Colonel JOHN B. HOGAN, Superintendent of Creek Emigration, Alabama.

1837, CALHOUN COUNTY, ALABAMA

David Phipps of Benton County, Alabama was issued a patent for 39.75 acres in Calhoun County, Alabama on 5 August 1837.

1837, PERRY COUNTY, ALABAMA

A patent was issued 15 May 1837 to John Phipps of Perry County, Alabama for 79.87 1/2 acres in that county.

On 5 August 1837, Martha Goodall Phipps of Madison County, Alabama received a patent for 39.91 acres in that county.

Another patent, dated 18 August 1837, was issued to John Phipps of Perry County. This was for 39.94 acres.

1840, CHEROKEE AND LEE COUNTIES, ALABAMA

A series of land patents was issued 29 June 1840 to John J. Williams and John Phipps for land in Chambers County, Alabama. Williams and Phipps are discussed above.

The “Seller” column in the table below indicates the member of the Creek nation who sold the land to John J. Williams and John Phipps. The “Sold” column indicates the date that this land was sold to them.

Seller Acres Sold County
Ok-par-lar-Fay 319.90 15 Apr 1834 Chambers
Che-Par-ne-luste 320.28 15 Sep 1834 Chambers
Tal-mar-se 319.98 3 Dec 1834 Chambers
Si-ye-har-tar 319.92 10 July 1834 Chambers
See-har-par-ye 320.94 — 1834 Chambers
No-cose-yoholo 319.46 26 Dec 1834 Chambers
Ki-yar-ke 319.66 10 June 1834 Chambers
Chis-car-li-kar 321 14 Jan 1835 Chambers
Ho-mar-har-ye 318.9 3 Dec 1834 Chambers
To-ho-ko-ni-che 318.72 9 June 1834 Lee
Soas-war 319.6 12 June 1834 Chambers
Futs-har-le-Ke 320 17 Apr 1834 Chambers

In the following land patents, also dated 29 June 1840, a Samuel Williams enters into the picture. In those patents, the land was sold to John J. Williams, Samuel Williams, and John Phipps. In addition, the land involved was in Lee County. The patents were then issued to all 3 men:

Seller Acres Sold County
Nil-le 320.2 20 Oct 1834 Lee
Tol-ofe-hajo 320.82 15 July 1834 Lee
Spe-tar 320.24 15 July 1834 Lee

1840, CHEROKEE COUNTY, ALABAMA

Note that the following individual is also listed in the same county in the 1850 census, where he appears as W. M C Phipps, born about 1819 in Georgia.

From the 1840 census, Cherokee County, Alabama:

  • Wm. M. C Phipps
    • Free white males:
      • 1 20-30 [born about 1810-1820]
    • Free white females:
      • 1 20-30 [born about 1810-1820]
      • 1 60-70 [born about 1770-1780]

1840, PERRY COUNTY, ALABAMA

In the following census entry, some faint numbers appear in addition to some which are much darker and clearer. It is assumed that the lighter digits are simply bleedthrough from another page.

From the 1840 census, Perry County, Alabama:

  • Isaiah Phipps
    • Free white males:
      • 1 15-20
      • 1 50-60 [born about 1780-1790]
    • Free white females:
      • 1 20-30
      • 1 50-60 [born about 1780-1790]

1840, SUMTER COUNTY, ALABAMA

The 1840 census includes an individual named, apparently, John Tipps or Fipps. The name looks probably more like Tipps, but with the faintest hint that perhaps the “T” might be crossed into an “F.”

The age, however, matches that of Jno Phips in the 1830 census in Perry County, Alabama. In addition, Sumter County is only a very short distance west of Perry County.

From the 1840 census, Sumter County, Alabama:

  • John Tipps [or Fipps?]
    • Free white males:
      • 1 10-15
      • 1 15-20
      • 1 20-30
      • 1 40-50 [born about 1790-1800]
    • Free white females:
      • 1 40-50

1841, CHAMBERS COUNTY, ALABAMA

A land patent was issued 30 January 1841 for land in Chambers County, Alabama. This was 316.75 acres. The land, according to the patent, was sold by War-ker-nuf-kar of the Creek tribe, in accordance with a treaty dated 24 March 1832.

pc

Paddy Carr, Creek Interpreter

The land was sold to John Phipps and Pady (Paddy) Carr (pictured) on 15 July 1834 (as noted above). Carr reassigned his interest in the land to Daniel McDougald.

As a result, the land was granted to John Phipps and Daniel McDougald. The land involved was the south half of Section 24, Township 22, Range 26 East.

Regarding Pady Carr, who originally bought the land from War-ker-nuf-kar along with John Phipps, various sources refer to him as a Creek interpreter. It is said that he was born about 1806 in Russell County, Creek Nation, Alabama. The attached portrait, dated 1838, refers to him in a title as “Paddy Carr, Creek Interpreter.”

Paddy Carr, according to that post, was half Irish and half Creek, and is said to have served as an interpreter for members of the Creek nation who visited President John Quincy Adams in 1826. Carr is identified as a chief and as the son of a merchant trader in Faith Serafin, Wicked Phenix City, Charleston, South Carolina: The History Press, 2014.

He should not be confused with Major Patrick Carr, called Paddy Carr, who was an earlier figure of the same name who was known for killing Loyalists in Georgia around the time of the Revolutionary War. The earlier Paddy Carr was himself killed in 1802. A factor which aids confusion is that the later Paddy Carr also had dealings in Georgia, but around the mid-1830s. Yet another Paddy Carr died in Iowa in 1901.

Paddy Carr came under suspicion of involvement with land fraud, as did John Phipps. Paddy Carr is referred to as “deeply involved in land frauds” in J. Leitch Wright, Jr., Creeks and Seminoles, Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1986, p. 274.

Christopher D. Haveman, in his dissertation mentioned earlier, titled The Removal of the Creek Indians from the Southeast, 1825-1838, mentions on p. 245 a later (1836?) Creek uprising. Creeks then sought revenge by burning the home of Paddy Carr. Carr is referred to in that context as a “former Creek agent.” The dissertation also says that the Creeks took 70 of Carr’s slaves.

Later in 1841, on 18 May, another land patent was issued involving John Phipps and land in Chambers County. The patent states that Winey, a member of the Creek tribe, had sold 319.24 acres in accordance with the 1832 treaty.

This land was sold by Winey of the Creek nation to John Phipps on 3 April 1834. The patent was therefore issued to John Phipps.

Three additional land patents were issued to John J. Williams and John Phipps in Chambers County on 2 March 1841. In one, 306.52 acres were sold on 20 October 1834 by Chee-le-hadjo to Robert S. Hardaway, an agent of the Columbus Land Company, on 12 June 1834. This was then assigned to John J. Williams and John Phipps.

In the 2nd patent on that same date, Ko-her-se-ematta had sold 312.9 acres to Robert S. Hardaway, agent of the Columbus Land Company, on 24 September 1834, and with the tract subsequently assigned to John J. Williams and John Phipps.

In the 3rd of these, 320 acres were sold by Chock-Ko-ho-ye to Robert S. Hardaway, agent of the Columbus Land Company, on 27 September 1834. Again, the land was then reassigned to John J. Williams and John Phipps.

1842, LEE COUNTY, ALABAMA

A patent was issued to John J. Williams and John Phipps for Lee County land on 27 January 1842. Tus [or Fus?]-Kar-noong-he of the Creek nation had sold 321.16 acres to John J. Williams and John Phipps on 24 October 1834.

Then a patent for land in Chambers County was issued to John J. Williams and John Phipps on 19 February 1842. Yar-kin-har-fixico had sold 319.7 acres to them on 3 December 1834.

On the same late, 19 February 1842, another patent was issued, but this one to John J. Williams, Samuel Williams, and John Phipps, for land in Lee County. So-yar-Kar-pe had sold 32.2 acres to these 3 men on 1 August 1834.

1843, CHAMBERS COUNTY, ALABAMA

Another similar patent is dated 20 May 1843 and again involves Chambers County land, this time 319.78 acres. Ho yan-ho ye had sold the land to John Phipps on 4 October 1834 in accordance with the 1832 treaty. The land was then patented to John Phipps.

1844, CHAMBERS COUNTY, ALABAMA

Another patent was issued 7 November 1844 to John J. Williams and John Phipps for 319.9 acres in Chambers County. The land was sold on 16 April 1834 to the two men by a woman identified as “Molly or Mary half Breed Negro.”

An additional patent is dated 25 November 1844 and again involves Chamber County land. This land was patented to John Phipps and John J. Williams. According to this patent, Hi-ye-ke-ne sold 321 acres to John Phipps and John J. Williams on 10 July 1834. The patent was issued to both of them.

This John J. Williams seems likely to have been the man of that name who is named in Corprew v. Arthur et al., an 1849 Alabama State Supreme Court case (15 Ala. 525) appealed from Chambers County. In the report of that case, which appears in Reports of Cases Argued and Determined in the Supreme Court of Alabama, 2nd ed., Book 17, St. Paul, Minnesota: West Publishing, 1907, at 525, it is stated that in about 1834 John J. Williams and Gideon Arthur went into partnership as Indian traders.

Arthur is described there as a white man living among the Creek Indians in territory which later became Chambers County.  He married a Creek woman.  Purchase of Indian lands by John J. Williams is mentioned in John T. Ellisor, The Second Creek War: Interethnic Conflict and Collusion on a Collapsing Frontier, Lincoln, Nebraska: University of Nebraska Press, 2010, p. 106.

A comment to a past post referred to John Phipps, there referred to as Major John Phipps, who is said to have married a Creek woman named “E. Noach ki ah.” According to the comment, this John Phipps operated a tannery with John J. Williams in what became Lanett, Chambers County, Alabama.

Earlier posts had raised speculation based on circumstantial evidence suggesting that perhaps some of the Phipps or Phips family could have been Indian traders. Was this the case with John Phipps, and was this one reason his services appear to have been secured as some sort of sub-agent?

1845, CHEROKEE COUNTY, ALABAMA

A land patent was issued to Hiram Rouseau and Sarah Phipps of Cherokee County, Alabama for 79.8 acres in that county on 1 May 1845. The relationship between this Hiram Rouseau and Sarah Phipps is not stated.

Unconfirmed genealogist data refers to a Hiram Rousseau (as spelled), born in 1771 in Culpeper County, Virginia, who is said to have married Sarah Martin in 1809 in Wilkes County, North Carolina. This Sarah is then said to have died in 1842 in Cherokee County, Alabama.

They were supposed to have had a daughter named Sarah Rodgers Rousseau. Could she have been the Sarah Phipps named in the land patent?

The 1850 census shows a Hiram “Russaw,” age 80 so born about 1770, born in Virginia, living with people named Higginbotham in Bienville Parish, Louisiana. No Sarah was evident.

A diary at the Alabama State Archives is discussed in a GenWeb page. This diary was kept by Sarah R. Espy, a daughter of Hiram Rousseau. He is said to have moved to Alabama around 1834-1835.

An entry from 1859 refers to visiting “Mrs. Phipps.” A later 1859 entry refers to “Miss Phipps.” Other similar entries can be found, including one mentioning “Mr. Phipps” in 1860.

Also in 1845 in Cherokee County, a land patent was issued 1 July 1845 to William M. C. Phipps of that county. This was for 39.97 acres in Cherokee County.

See also the 1840 census listing above for Wm. M.C. Phipps in Cherokee County, as well as the 1850 census listing below for W.M.C. Phipps in Cherokee County. Other land patents to him, as dated 1848 and 1849, also appear below.

1848, CHEROKEE COUNTY, ALABAMA

Another land patent to William M. C. Phipps of Cherokee County, Alabama is dated 10 April 1848. This one was for 40.1 acres in Cherokee County.

1849, CHEROKEE COUNTY, ALABAMA

Yet another land patent to William M. C. Phipps of Cherokee County was issued on 1 September 1849. This one was for 40.1 acres in Cherokee County.

1850, BENTON COUNTY, ALABAMA

Jefferson Phips appeared in the 1850 census in Benton County, Alabama. See the land patents below, from 1852-1876, for Jefferson Phips of Benton County for land in Cleburne County.

From the 1850 census, 28th district, Benton County, Alabama, 19 November 1850, #390/392:

  • Jefferson Phips [rest unreadable]
  • [Another line? (unreadable)]
  • [page break]
  • Evaline Phipps, 7 [born about 1843], female, Alabama
  • M C [or E?] Phipps, 5 [born about 1845], female, Alabama
  • N Phipps, 4 [born about 1846], female, Alabama
  • Z [or Y?] W Phipps, 2/12 [age 2 months], Alabama

1850, CHEROKEE COUNTY, ALABAMA

Note that the W.M C Phipps listed below also appeared in the same county in the 1840 census as Wm. M. C Phipps, born about 1810-1820. This William is mentioned in Joel C. DuBose, ed., Notable Men of Alabama, Vol. 2, Atlanta: Southern Historical Association, 1904, p. 300, as W. M. C. Phipps who married Lucy Echols.

Their daughter Almeda, according to that source, married Henry F. Penn. Henry and Almeda (Phipps) Penn were the parents of James William Penn, born 17 September 1866 in Etowah County, Alabama.

From the 1850 census, [26th?] district, Cherokee County, Alabama, 27 [month unclear] 1850, #297/297:

  • W. M C Phipps, 31 [born about 1819], male, farmer, real estate $2,000, born Georgia
  • Lucy I [or J?] Phipps, 30 [born about 1820], female, Georgia
  • Emily A Phipps, 10 [born about 1840], female, Alabama

1850, PERRY COUNTY ALABAMA

The 1850 census shows an elderly Josiah Phipps there. He was born about 1772 in North Carolina.

From the 1850 census, Five Mile Beat, Perry County, Alabama, 25 December 1850, #54/55:

  • William Phipps, 27 [born about 1823], male, farmer, real estate $125, born Alabama
  • Sarah M Phipps, 32 [born about 1818], female, Georgia
  • Mary J [or I?] Phipps, 9 [born about 1841], female,  Alabama
  • Martha A Phipps, 6 [born about 1844], female, Alabama
  • Sarah A Phipps, 4 [born about 1846], female, Alabama
  • John Phipps, 3 [born about 1847], male,  Alabama
  • Josiah Phipps, 78 [born about 1772], male, North Carolina

1850, SUMTER COUNTY, ALABAMA

Regarding the 84-year-old Nancy Crenshaw below, unconfirmed secondary sources claim that she was the mother of the Sarah E. Phipps who is listed as the apparent wife of John E. Phipps.

From the 1850 census, Black Bluff District, Sumter County, Alabama, 27 November 1850, #783/799:

  • John E Phipps, 22 [born about 1828], male, farmer, real estate $500, born Alabama
  • Sarah E Phipps, 18 [born about 1832], female, Alabama
  • Mary M Phipps, 2 [born about 1848], female, Alabama
  • Sarah O Phipps, 5/12 [age 5 months, female, Alabama
  • Mary A Phipps, 50 [born about 1800], female, South Carolina
  • Nancy Crenshaw, 84 [born about 1766], female, South Carolina
  • [page break – same date]
  • Nathan [D.?] Yarborough, 21 [born about 1829], male, farmer, Alabama
  • William W Yarborough, 20 [born about 1830], male, farmer, Alabama

For some quirky reason, in the following census entry John and Martha are shown with a separate household and family number.

From the 1850 census, Black Bluff District, Sumter County, Alabama, 27 November 1850, #[786/802?] and [787/803?]:

  • Isaiah Phipps, 29 [born about 1821], male, farmer, real estate $125, born Alabama
  • Mary Phipps, 25 [born about 1825], female, Alabama
  • James Phipps, 8 [born about 1842], male, Alabama
  • Elizabeth Phipps 5 [born about 1845], female, Alabama
  • John Phipps, 3 [born about 1847], male, Alabama
  • Martha Phipps, 1/12 [age 1 month], female, Alabama

1851, CHEROKEE COUNTY, ALABAMA

Another land patent to William M. C. Phipps of Cherokee County, Alabama for land in that county was issued 1 November 1851. This was for 40.1 acres.

1852, BIBB COUNTY, ALABAMA

A land patent was issued 2 February 1852 to Walker Fipps of Bibb County, Alabama for land in that county. This was for 39.85 acres.

1852-1876, CLEBURNE COUNTY, ALABAMA

Beginning in 1852, several land patents for land in Cleburne County, Alabama were issued to Jefferson Phips, presumably the same individual in each instance. In each case, he is referred to as Jefferson Phips of Benton County, Alabama, except in the patent dated 1 October 1860, when he is referred to as Jefferson Phips of Calhoun County, Alabama.

This does not represent a change in his residence. Instead, Benton County was renamed Calhoun County for a time, to reflect current political views in support of John C. Calhoun but in opposition to those of Thomas Hart Benton. Calhoun/Benton County is adjacent to Cleburne County, where the land was located which Jefferson Phips acquired.

See also Jefferson Phips in the 1850 census listing above.

From land patents issued to Jefferson Phips:

Date Residence Acres Location
1 Dec 1852 Benton Co. 39.99 Cleburne Co.
1 Jan 1859 (1) Benton Co. 39.89 Cleburne Co.
1 Jan 1859 (2) Benton Co. 40 Cleburne Co.
1 Jan 1859 (3) Benton Co. 40 Cleburne Co.
1 Oct 1860 Calhoun Co. 39.99 Cleburne Co.
25 Mar 1876 Benton Co. 40 Cleburne Co.

1853, HALE COUNTY, ALABAMA

A patent was issued to William Phipps of Perry County, Alabama for 40.9 1/2 acres in Hale County, Alabama on 1 August 1853.

1853, HALE COUNTY, ALABAMA

Another land patent was issued to William Phipps of Perry County, Alabama for land in Hale County, Alabama on 1 June 1858. This one was for 40.07 acres.

1860, CALHOUN COUNTY, ALABAMA

At the time of the 1860 census, Benton County, Alabama was temporarily called Calhoun County, as noted above. Jefferson Fips was listed there in that year. See also the 1850 census listing above for Jefferson Phips, as well as the land patents for Jefferson Phips from 1852 to 1876.

From the 1860 census, Township 14 of Range 11, Benton County, Alabama, with post office at Oakland, 26 June 1860, #488/488:

  • Jeffer[son?] Fips, 52 [born about 1808], male, farmer, real estate $400, personal estate $2,000, born Tennessee, could not read and write
  • Mary A Fips, 37 [born about 1823], female, Georgia
  • Evaline Fips, 17 [born about 1843], female, Alabama, attended school
  • Mary Fips, 15 [born about 1845], female, Alabama
  • Mar[j?]ory Fips, 13 [born about 1847], female, Alabama
  • John [W?] Fips, 11 [born about 1849], male, Alabama
  • Rachael Fips, 8 [born about 1852], female, Alabama
  • [Sherne?] J Fips, 6 [born about 1854], female, Alabama, attended school
  • George [W?] Fips, 5 [born about 1855], male, Alabama
  • Sarah F Fips, 2 [born about 1858], female, Alabama

1860, HALE COUNTY, ALABAMA

Another land patent to William Phipps of Perry County, Alabama for land in Hale County, Alabama was issued 1 October 1860. This time, it was for 40.07 acres.

1880, HALE COUNTY, ALABAMA

The following William Phipps would presumably be the same one who received the 1853 and 1860 land patents in Hale County. Note that his parents were born in North Carolina.

From the 1880 census, Beat 13, Hale County, Alabama, 25 June 1880, p. 32, #297/319:

  • William Phipps, white male, 57 [born about 1823], married, farmer, born Alabama, his father born North Carolina, his mother born North Carolina
  • Sarah Phipps, white female, 62 [born about 1818], wife, married, keeping house, could not write, Georgia, South Carolina, Georgia
  • Mandy S. Phipps, white female, 26 [born about 1854], daughter, single, Alabama, Alabama, Georgia
  • William W. Phipps, white male, 22 [born about 1858], son, single, “Farming & Teaching,” Alabama, Alabama, Georgia
  • Nancy C Phipps, white female, 20 [born about 1860], daughter, single,
  • John H. Hughs, white male, 27 [born about 1853], single, farmhand, could not read or write, Alabama, North Carolina, Alabama

CONCLUSION

One question, which cannot be expected to have a single universal answer, is where these early Alabama Phipps residents, or their parents or grandparents, came from earlier.

Much of the early Phipps activity in Alabama as referred to above centers around land speculation in Chambers County and adjacent Lee County. Both Chambers and Lee Counties sit along the Georgia state line. Without conducting additional research at this point, it would appear that the John Phipps involved in Lee and Chambers County land deals may have had Georgia dealings earlier.

In addition, William M.C. Phipps, who shows up in Cherokee County by 1850, was born in Georgia according to the census in that year. Cherokee County is also situated along the Georgia state line. Jefferson Fips or Phips of Benton and Cleburne Counties in Alabama was born in Tennessee and married a woman born in Georgia.

Some North Carolina roots are suggested. The parents of William Phipps, who was in Hale County, Alabama by 1853, were born in North Carolina. We’ve noted the 1845 Cherokee County land patent to Hiram Rouseau and Sarah Phipps, with some unconfirmed hints that there may have been Wilkes County, North Carolina connections.

In addition, a Josiah Phipps appears in Perry County, Alabama in 1850 at age 78, and he was born about 1772 in North Carolina. Who this Josiah Phipps was is not clear, but a very likely candidate would seem to have been the Josiah Phips (as spelled) who is listed in the 1800 census in Burke County, North Carolina. Burke County is in western North Carolina.

In that census, assuming he was the oldest in the household, his age appears as 16-25. This would mean that he was born about 1775-1784. Since census ages were frequently somewhat off, he could easily have been the Josiah Phipps born about 1772 in the 1850 census.

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