Some Brunswick County, Virginia Deeds

Copies of 4 very interesting deed records from Brunswick County, Virginia were sent by the webmaster of the excellent Witcher Genealogy blog.

A while back, we reported that he had found highly significant records pertaining to a John Fips or Phips who died about 1768. Records pertaining to his estate and to his family members then showed up in several counties of Virginia. In particular, records pertaining to his widow Tabitha have been found in Charlotte, Halifax, Pittsylvania, and Brunswick Counties in Virginia. In addition, John was living in Lunenburg County a bit earlier.

In addition, that family clearly links to Joseph Phipps or Phips of Brunswick County, who appears to have been the patriarch who was the focus of Mrs. Howard Woodruff’s 1972 book on his family. Speculation that Joseph may have been a son of John and Tabitha.

Members of the family of John and Tabitha migrated into Surry and Wilkes Counties in North Carolina and into Lawrence County, Indiana (where members of the family of Samuel Phips of Ashe County, North Carolina also moved); members of Joseph’s family migrated into Wake and Wilkes Counties in North Carolina and likely Lawrence County, Indiana.

In addition, Joseph himself had land dealings in Bute County, North Carolina, which later became Warren County, while living in Brunswick County, Virginia. Various bits of strong circumstantial evidence seem to very likely link this family to the two orphans of Goochland County, Virginia who we’ve mentioned on various occasions before.

Circumstantial factors appear to likely link them also to a John Phips of Warren County (that same county which was formed from Bute County), North Carolina, who bought land in 1785 in Amelia County, Virginia, with other apparent Amelia County connections.

Through much of all of this, Brunswick County appears to have served as a sort of almost “headquarters” for the family, with the phrase “of Brunswick County” appearing in various records pertaining to family members in other counties and even in other colonies or states. There was also a James in the Pigg River area referred to as being of Brunswick County.

As already noted, in 1972 Mrs. Howard Woodruff wrote a book on Joseph Phipps of Brunswick County and his descendants and apparent siblings. This book can be downloaded from the “Books” area of Family Search, accessible from the “Search” drop-down menu which might not be visible on a mobile device in portrait rather than landscape position. She saw Benjamin Phipps or Phips of Albemarle Parish as probably being Joseph’s brother. Albemarle Parish should not be confused with Albemarle County, but was located in Surry and then in Sussex County.

We should never lose sight of the fact that countless – literally countless – circumstantial factors show this family as interacting within a social framework which involved a number of interrelated surnames over and over again. These were names like Reeves or Rives, Cocke or Cook, Eppes or Epes or Epps, and Poythress, and the like.

In particular, the Reeves connection seems to have begun in England and to have persisted in Virginia and was later seen in the relationship of Samuel Phips of Ashe County, North Carolina to his father in law George Reeves of adjacent Grayson County, Virginia, who was in turn an Eppes or Epps heir.

One unanswered question is why various family members were involved in so many locations at once or nearly at once. What were they up to?

In the context just described, the 4 Brunswick County, Virginia deeds mentioned above, as recently received, should be of particular interest. These deeds are discussed below. First, they will be summarized, then some of the names appearing in those deeds will be identified to the extent possible at this point. Finally, transcriptions will be presented.

SUMMARIES OF THE DEEDS

(1) 25 January 1768, Joseph Phips to Thomas Clanton

Joseph Phips of St. Andrews Parish, Brunswick County mortgaged a variety of personal property – a slave, furniture, livestock, and “working tools,” all for £100 to Thomas Clanton of Meherrin Parish in Brunswick County. The condition was that Joseph Phips had until 16 January 1773 to redeem this property by paying the £100 with interest.

One of the witnesses to this document was Absm. (Absalom) Bennett and a couple men named Clark. The surname Clark is a name which comes up in various records in connection with the closely associated Wytch, Wyche, etc. family, as well as the Rives or Reeves family and Absalom Bennett, who is discussed below.

(2) 23 October 1769, William Ray and wife Anne, and Baker Ray and wife Lucy, to Joseph Phipps

Two couples named Ray (the surname appears as “Wray” in some records), of Meherrin Parish, Brunswick County, deeded land in Meherrin Parish to Joseph Phipps of St. Andrews Parish in Brunswick County. This land amounted to 250 acres, and the land description mentions the north side of “Cold Water Run” (Coldwater Creek).

This document was witnessed by Briggs Goodrich, Edward Tatum, and Yerby Stroud.

(3) 28 November 1771, William Ray, Jr. to Tabitha Fips

In this deed, William Ray, Jr. of Johnson County, North Carolina sold 100 acres in Brunswick County, Virginia to Tabitha Fips of Meherrin Parish in Brunswick County. The land description refers to the north side of “Great Cold Water.”

Note that the 2nd deed, dated 23 October 1769, mentioned the north side of “Cold Water Run.” Note also, however, that although this deed refers to Tabitha Fips as being of Meherrin Parish, the previous deed referred to Joseph Phipps as being of St. Andrews Parish. Where was the dividing line between these two parishes?

This deed was witnessed by John Randle, Barnett Randle, Benja. Whealer, William Ray, and Joseph Fips. This Joseph Fips is presumably the Joseph “Phips” of the 1st deed, above, and the Joseph “Phipps” of the 2nd deed.

(4) 12 December 1776, Tabitha Phips to Joseph Phips

In this deed, Tabitha Phips of Brunswick County sold 100 acres in Brunswick County to Joseph Phips, who was also of Brunswick County. No parish was mentioned, but this was late in 1776. Sentiment was shifting away from recognition of the old Church of England parishes, and a bill to dissolve both Meherrin Parish in Brunswick County and the parish of St. Anne in Albemarle County was introduced on 16 December 1777.

The land was sold for only £17, which of course suggests a relationship. The land description refers to “Joseph Phips’s line,” as well as “Powell’s line,” in addition to the line of Jeremiah Mire or Mixe or Mize, apparently Mize.

This deed was witnessed by Briggs Goodrich (who had also witnessed the 2nd deed above, from Ray to Joseph Phipps), John Steed, Randle Woolsey, and Martha Bennett. Martha Bennett can be assumed to have been related to Absalom Bennett, and Randle Woolsey was presumably related to Abner Woolsey who married Mary Phipps.

The Powell name frequently comes into play, sometimes in direct association with the Epps and Reeves families. John Steed may very well have been related to the later Steed family who surface in the same Warren County, North Carolina which has already been mentioned, with direct connections from him and his wife to the Brunswick County, Virginia estates of Jedathan Steed and Benjamin Phipps. This is discussed in the Steed and Phipps Family Papers at the University of North Carolina.

Of course, there were other relevant Brunswick County deeds as well as records of other types in that county. For now, however, let’s concentrate on these 4 deeds. Who, then, were the various individuals referred to in these documents?

PEOPLE MENTIONED IN THE DEEDS

Absalom Bennett

A key figure in the deeds as well as other records was Absalom Bennett. He was the father of Julius D. Bennett, who names his father in his 1807 Wake County, North Carolina will.

Absolom or Absolum or Absolem Bennett is the man who witnessed the following:

  • A 1781 Brunswick County deed which was also witnessed by 4 men named “Wyche” (the significance of this name is discussed in previous posts)
  • A 1781 Brunswick County deed from James Fips of Brunswick County (witnessed by his wife Elizabeth) to James Upchurch, Sr.
  • A 1784 Brunswick County deed from Randle Woolsey and wife Elizabeth and Joell Woolsey (the significance of the Woolsey name was discussed in past posts)
  • A 1784 will of James Upchurch, presumably the James Upchurch Sr. of the 1781 deed; the will refers to land “called Phipp’s land”

Then, in 1790, Absolem Bennett sued Benjamin Phipps, Robert Westmoreland, and Joseph Phipps with depositions taken from women in North Carolina including one in Wake County, North Carolina. Then in 1807 in Wake County, the will of Julius D. Bennett mentions his father Absalom Bennett, Elizabeth Phipps (relationship not stated), and Polley Phipps (relationship not stated).

For more on Absalom and Julius Bennett:

Thomas Clanton

The 1768 deed by Joseph Phips to Thomas Clanton, transcribed below, seems a bit strange. This was 1768, the year in which the John Fips estate becomes an issue in Charlotte County, but in this record Joseph appears to be virtually mortgaging his life away for a measly £100.

Another thing which seems odd is that the horse brand mentioned consists of a capital letter “M,” with a sort of 3/4 circle beside it. Joseph appears to have been illiterate, but was there some significance to the letter “M,” or was the horse earlier branded by someone else?

This document reads very much like a chancery case in Bedford County, Virginia in 1759, filed as Thomas Yuille v. John Phelps. The Phelps family appears to probably tie in, somehow, although at least some of them were clearly mulatto, as specifically stated in records.

Yuille, who was a Chesterfield County merchant, extended credit to John Phelps of Bedford County, who had been buying “great Quantitys” of “good Wares of Merchindizes” from Yuille. Phelps gained the trust of Yuille, but eventually needed to pay, and didn’t have the money.

As a result, John Phelps entered into a mortgage similar to this one, in which he essentially deeded everything he owned, both real estate and personal property, to Yuille, with the caveat that the agreement would be voided if John would come up with the money.

John appears to have a few token payments, then lost interest. He would then come up with excuse after excuse why he could not pay and could not turn over his property either.

The implication in the Brunswick County document seems to be that Joseph Phips is in tight financial circumstances and is essentially receiving a loan, in a document which evidently operated much the same as a modern pawn shop agreement. This was earlier the same year that the estate of John Fips, with Tabitha as apparently widow, surfaces in Charlotte County, with Tabitha later showing up in several other counties including Brunswick. Was there some connection?

Regarding Thomas Clanton, the Virginia Gazette on 26 November 1767 (Purdie & Dixon edition) ran an ad pertaining to the sale of “likely negroes” from the estate of Edward Clanton, deceased.

Briggs Goodrich

Briggs Goodrich is said to have been born in 1728 in Brunswick County, a son of Edward Goodrich, Jr. and Anne Briggs, and to have died in 1755 in Greensville County, Virginia. He is said to have married Mary Camp.

Briggs Goodrich was supposedly of St. Andrews Parish in Brunswick County, the same parish which Joseph Phipps is noted as being “of” in one of the deeds. A daughter of Briggs Goodrich was supposedly Mary, born about 1756, who married Howell Harris, which gives us yet another Harris reference. Of course, as noted numerous times, the immigrant surveyor John Phips of Jamestown arrived in 1621 with his fellow surveyor who was a Harris.

More significantly, a transcription of a deed found in Deed Book 14, Brunswick County, dated “eighty” (according to a transcription) November 1779 was witnessed by several people. The first two of them are transcribed as Absolum Bennett, discussed above, and Briggs Goodrich. This was a deed involving land on the south side of Fountains Creek in Brunswick County.

Jeremiah Mire or Mixe or Mize

The name has elsewhere been transcribed as Jeremiah Mize, although at one point in one of the deeds carefully examined here, it seems to look more like Mire. A genealogist’s post in a RootsWeb discussion board refers to Jeremiah Mize as an uncle of Anderson Wray (see the Wray or Ray family below), son of Nathaniel Wray, Sr. and his wife Mourning.

The person posting this information then refers to a family lineage from here which “goes on into” a Barnes, that being John A. Barnes, son of John Barnes, with John Barnes having a brother Richard Barnes who married Polly Wray.

Sources for the discussion board information are not indicated, at least not at that point. If this is so, however, then it suggests a somewhat indirect connection to the Barnes family. The Barnes name, you’ll recall, comes into play in connection with John and Tabitha Fips in various records.

Another factor which might be only coincidental is that, according to unconfirmed information, a Jeremiah Mize, son of one of that name born in 1698 in Lunenburg County, Virginia, was born in North Carolina and went to Pulaski County, Kentucky.

This is the same county which was discussed in the last post in connection with Littleberry Phipps and possibly, in a conjectural sense, with Daniel F. Phipps.

A later Joshua Mize (son of the same Jeremiah?) is said to have moved into Wilkes County, North Carolina, where he died in 1790. This is the same county where Samuel Phips was living, presumably the same place which by 1800 had been redefined as Ashe County.

In addition, one web page cites the claim that a Benjamin Ray (see the Ray/Wray family below) was an illegitimate son of an Edy Wray who married Jeremiah Mize.

For more on Jeremiah Mize:

The Powell family

A transcription of a deed dated 29 March 1791 (Deed Book 15), concerns 200 acres in Brunswick County which changed hands from John Powell to James Powell, who were both of Brunswick County. The land description in that deed refers to Reedy Branch and “Phipps line” (mentioned twice) as well as “Phipps path.” Also mentioned is “Camps line;” Briggs Goodrich, referred to above, is supposed to have married a Camp.

The Ray or Wray family

Although they are referred to as “Ray” in Deeds 2 and 3 (above), in other records members of this family sometimes appear as “Wray.” A web page titled “Fun Facts About Those Rays from Brunswick County, Virginia” refers to another deed which is of interest. This deed is dated 28 June 1779 and comes from Brunswick County Deed Book 13, p. 289.

In that deed, Nathaniel Wray and his wife Mourney of Meherrin Parish in Brunswick County sold 150 acres to John Jones, Benjamin Hicks, Beverly Brown, and John or Joseph Greenhill. The land is referred to as having been, as abstracted, “purchased by Joseph Philips of the said Nathaniel Ray.”

The obvious first question is whether this Joseph Philips was the same individual as Joseph Phipps AKA Phips. The second question is why Nathaniel Wray would be selling this land if he had sold it to Phips or Philips.

Both questions are answered further into the abstract. There it is said that Joseph “Philips” “departed this life” without having received a deed, so it couldn’t be the Joseph Phipps we’ve been discussing. In that will, according to the abstract, he went ahead anyway and “devised the same” to his wife Elizabeth, even though he evidently didn’t have a deed.

It sounds, then, as though the “Philips” family believed that the land was theirs, but the Wray family believed otherwise. Since the land was being sold, evidently it was ultimately determined to belong to Wray, and yet evidently they believed there was enough of a caveat involved that the matter should be specified in the deed.

For more information on the Ray or Wray family:

Yerby Stroud

Regarding Yerby Stroud, someone of that name and of a somewhat later generation (born about 1761), is said to have settled in South Carolina and then in Georgia. He is said to have had a brother, William, who supposedly killed more Tories than any other soldier in South Carolina.

Edward Tatum

The Tatum family shows up in various records as associated with the families of Reeves or Rives, Epps or Eppes, Wych or Wyche, and Bolling. Unsourced genealogists’s web pages seem to suggest that at least a couple individuals named Edward Tatum were in Brunswick County during this period, one of whom supposedly moved to Guilford County, North Carolina.

We’ve discussed the “Phripp” family of Norfolk on various occasions, with that family sometimes going by several variant forms of what looks more like “Phip” or the like. The 1734 Norfolk County will of Richard Joell was witnessed by J. Phripp and refers to Capt. Nathaniel Tatum as Joell’s friend. In addition, we’ve run into an awful lot of surveyors, and one of the Edward Tatums was a Brunswick County surveyor in 1732.

Benjamin Whealer

Regarding Benja. “Wheale[r?],”, an abstract of a 1773 Brunswick County deed has Barnett Randle selling land to Benj. “Whealther,” Sr. Barnett Randle and John Randle are referred to as sons of William Randle, Sr. in his Brunswick County will, which was proved 22 April 1771.

The will was proved by the oaths of 3 men, one of whom was Benjamine “Whealer,” and the other being “Rendle Woolsey.” (We’ve discussed the Woolsey connection in past posts, and also see below.) A 1784 Brunswick deed abstract has Randle Woolsey and his wife Elizabeth and Joell Woolsey, all of Brunswick County, selling hand as witnessed by Absalom Bennett, who is discussed above.

The Woolsey family

As noted in past posts, the 1803 Brunswick County will of Joseph Phipps (as transcribed in A. Maxim Coppage, Virginia Settlers, Vol. 3, refers to his daughter Mary Woolsey. That will was proven in 1809. Children of Joseph are identified in the will as John, Benjamin, and Mary (Phipps) Woolsey.

Mary Phipps is supposed to have married Abner Woolsey, born in Brunswick County about 1770.

A 1785 Brunswick County deed from Joel Woolsey to Randle Woolsey mentions “John Powell’s line” (see the Powell references above). A 1786 Brunswick County document pertaining to the inability of a certain Jane Atkinson to come to court to acknowledge a deed is from Paul Tatum (see Edward Tatum above) and others to Thomas Stith, John Powell, and Thomas Claiborne, “gentlemen.”

Claiborne is another of those recurring names discussed in past posts, and this Thomas Stith was presumably related to Drury Stith, the well-known surveyor.

TRANSCRIPTIONS OF THE DEEDS

(1) 25 January 1768, from Deed Book 9, p. 177

[in margin, at upper left, page number:]
176 . . .

[In margin:]
Phips
to
Clanton

[body of text:]
Know all Men by these Presents that I Joseph Phips of the County of Brunswick & Parish of Saint Andrews for and in Consideration of the Sum of One Hundred Pounds Current Money of Virginia to me in hand paid by Thomas Clanton of the same County & Parish of Meherin whereof I do hereby Acknowledge the Receipt and myself therewith intirely [sic] Satisfy’d & Contented have Bargained Sold [Set?] Over and Delivered and by these Presents in Plain & Open [Market? or Marker?] According to due form of Law do Bargain Sell & Deliver unto the said Thomas Clanton One Negro Girl Named Patt with her Increase [their?] feather bed [or beds?] & furniture one Bay Mare & horse

[in margin at upper left, page number:]
177

[body of text:]
Colt the Mare Branded on the Near Buttock with three Dotts [word obscured by ink blot or shadow] Colt not [Deckt? or Dockt?] nor Branded One Sorrell Horse Branded on Each thigh Resembling th[us?] [(a capital “M” with a sort of half circle appearing to the upper left from the “M;” see photo] Thirteen Head of Cattle two of them mark’d with a swallow fork in the Right Ear & Crop of two Slits in the left the other part of the said Cattle markd [sic] with a small Crop in the Right year [sic; presumably “ear” was intended] & an underkeel [or underheel?] in the left Ear Four head of Sheep of the said mark of Crop & underheel [or underkeel?] thirty Head Hogs Mark’d a Crop & Underheel [or Underkeel?] as in aforesaid & all my hous hold Furniture whatsoever and working Tools of all Sorts To have and to Hold the said Bargained Premises Unto the said Thomas Clanton his Heirs Executors Admors [sic; abbreviation for administrators] and assigns to the only proper use & behoof of him the said Thomas Clanton his Heirs &c. forever and I the said Joseph Phips for myself my heirs [Exors?[ & Admors [sic; presumably executors and administrators] the said Bargaind [sic] Premises unto the said Thomas Clanton his Heirs Exors & Admors or Assigns against all and all Manner of Persons shall & will warrant and forever Defend by these Presents Provided Nevertheless that if the said Joseph Phips his Heirs Exors Admors One or either of them do or shall well and truly pay or cause to be paid unto the sd. [i.e. said] Thomas Thomas [sic; word repeated] Clanton his Heirs &c. the full and Just Sum of One Hundred Pounds Current Money of Virginia with Lawfull Interest thereon from the Date hereof on or before the 16th Day of January 1773 for the Redemption of the said Premises above Mentioned then this Present Bill of Sale to be Void otherwise to stand in full force and Virtue In Witness whereof I the said Joseph Phips have hereunto set my hand and affixed my Seal this 25th Day of January 1768.

[signed:]
Joseph his + mark Phips (L S)

[signed by witnesses:]
Absm. Bennett
George Clark Jun
Elisha Clark
John Roberts –

(2) 23 October 1769, from deed book p. 558

[in margin:]

55[1?]

Ray[s?] [?]rs.
to
Phips –

[main body of text:]

This Indenture made this twenty third day of October in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and sixty nine Between William Ray Senr. and Anne his wife and Baker Ray and Lucy his wife of the County of Brunswick and parish of Meherin and Joseph Phipps of the said County and parish of Saint Andrews Witnesseth that the said Wm Ray & Anne his wife and Baker Ray & Lucy his wife for and in consideration of the Sum of eighty pounds Current money of Virginia to them in hand paid by the said Joseph Phips the receipt whereof they do hereby acknowledge hath granted Bargained & Sold Aliened enfeoffed and confirmed and by these presents doth grant bargain and Sell Alien enfeoffe and confirme [sic] unto the said Joseph Phips his Heirs and assigns for ever a certain Tract or parcel of Land in the County aforesaid and parish of Meherin containing two hundred and fifty Acres more or less and is Bounded as followeth to wit, Beginning at a white oak on the North side of Cold Water Run thence west to a corner white oak thence east to a black oak thence west to a white oak thence South to a white oak a corner tree thence west to a hickory thence east to a pine on cold water thence east to a white oak thence east to a hickory – from thence down to the Beginning also all woods underwoods profits commodities advantages hereditiments [sic] and appurtenances whatsoever to the said land belonging or in any wise appurtaining and also the reversion & reversions remainder and remainders rents and Services of the said premises and of every part and parcel thereof and all Right title Interest property Impertenances claim and demand whatsoever of them the said William Ray Senr. and Anne his wife and Baker Ray and Lucy his wife their Heirs or assigns of in or to the said premises or any part thereof – To have and to hold all and singular the premises above mentioned and every part and parcel thereof with the appurtenances unto the said Joseph Phips his Heirs and assigns for ever and the said William Ray Senr. and Anne his wife and Baker Ray and Lucy his wife and their Heirs the said premises and every part thereof unto the said Joseph Phips his Heirs and assigns shall and will warrant and for ever Defend by these presents In Witness whereof the said William Ray and Anne his wife and Baker Ray & Lucy his wife hath hereunto set their hands and affixed their Seals the day and year first above Written –

[signed:]
William his X mark Ray (LS)
Anne her X mark Ray (LS)
Baker his R mark Ray (LS)
Lucy her X mark Ray (LS)

Signed Sealed & Delivered
In the presence of [signed:]
Briggs Goodrich
Edward Tatum
Yerby Stroud

(3) 28 November 1771, from Deed Book 10, pp. 371-372

[in margin:]

Ray & Wife
to
Phips –

[body of text:]

This Indenture made this twenty eighty day of November in the year of our Lord Christ one thousand seven hundred and Seventy one Between William Ray junior of Johnson County in the province of North Carolina and Tabitha Fips of the County of Brunswick and Parish of Meherrin Witnesseth That the said William Ray for and in Consideration of the Sum of twenty Pounds Current Money of Virginia to him in hand paid by the said Tabitha Fips before the Signing and Sealing of These Presents the Receipt whereof the said William Ray doth hereby Confess and acknowledge, and the said Tabitha Fips before the Signing and Sealing of these presents and the said William Ray his Heirs Executors, and Administrations of and from all and every part of the said Sum doth hereby [acquit?] and for ever defend by these presents discharge Hath Bargained Sold Aliened made over and Confirmed and doth by these presents Bargain Sell make over and Confirm unto the said Tabitha Fips and to her Heirs and Assigns for ever one certain Tract or parcel of Land with the Appurtenances – Situate lying and being on the North side of Great Cold Water on the Branches of the said Cold Water in the County of Brunswick containing one hundred Acres more or less the said Land being Granted by Patent to William Ray Senr. and made over by Deed to his said abovementioned Son William Ray junior andBounded as followeth, to wit, Beginning at a Corner White Oak on Jeremiah Mize’s line, thence North to a black Oak on the [page break]

[next page, headed “372” in original text in margin:]

R[eed?]y Branch a Corner tree between John Powell and the said William Ray thence down the said Branch East to a Corner Pine between the said Ray and John Powell, thence South East to a Corner White Oak on Smith’s line thence along the said line to a Corner black Jack made by the said William Ray Senior and Son William Ray junior thence West along the dividing line to the said beginning White Oak. To have and to hold the said One hundred Acres of Land with all and every the Rights Privileges Improvements and Appurtenances of all and every kind whatsoever unto the said Tabitha Fips and to her Heirs and Assigns free from the [? (looks like “latt”)], Hindrance, Molestation of him the said William Ray his Heirs and Assigns unto the only proper Use and [?]f of her the said Tabitha Fips her Heirs and Assigns forever And the said William Ray for himself and his Heirs doth Covenant and Agree to and with the said Tabitha Fips her Heirs and Assigns that the Right and Title of the said Land and premises and of every part thereof against every person he and they will Warrant and forever by these presents defend and Maintain unto the said Tabitha Fips her Heirs and Assigns forever In Witness whereof the said William Ray hath hereunto set his hand and affixed his Seal the Day and Year herein first above Written –

[signed:]
William Ray – (Seal)
Mary her + mark Ray – (Seal)

Signed Sealed & Delivered in the presence of [signed:]
John Randle
Barnett Randle
Benja. Wheale[r?]
William Ray
Joseph Fips –

At a Court held for Brunswick County the 23d. Day of March 1772

This Indenture was proved by the Oaths of John Randle, Barnett Randle, and Joseph Fips Witnesses thereto and Ordered to be Recorded –

Teste
[signature unclear, obscured by scratch on microfilm, apparently Peter Pelham [see next record]] junr. Ct. C[ur?].

(4) 12 December 1776, from Deed Book 12, pp. 247-248

[in margin at top left, page number:]
247 . . .

[in margin:]
Phips
to Phips

[body of text:]
This Indenture made this twelfth Day [“of” missing] December in the Year of our Lord Christ One Thousand Seven Hundred and Seventy six Between Tabitha Phips of the County of Brunswick of the one part and Joseph Phips of the said County of the other Part Witnesseth that for and in Consideration of the Sum of Seventeen Pounds Current Money of Virginia unto me the Said Tabitha Phips in hand paid by the said Joseph Phips the Receipt whereof she the said Tabitha Phips doth hereby Acknowledge and herself therewith entirely Satisfied and contented Hath Bargained Sold Aliened Released and Confirmed and by these presents for herself and Heirs doth Grant Bargain Sell Alien Release and Confirm unto the said Joseph Phips his Heirs and Assigns forever One certain Tract or parcel of Land containing One Hundred Acres be the same more or less lying and being in the County of Brunswick and Bounded as followeth to wit. Beginning at a black Jack a Corner in Joseph Phips’s line Thence to a Pine Corner in John Powell’s line Thence along said [page break]

[in margin at upper left, page number:]
248

[body of text:]
Powell’s line to a black Jack a corner in Jeremiah Mi[r? or x?]e’s [Note: The name has elsewhere been transcribed as “Mize”] line, Thence along said [Mire?]’s line to a Corner white Oak in Joseph Phips’s Thence along said Phips’s line to his Corner black [sic] to the Beginning With all the Houses Orchards Gardens Fences Woods and Underwoods Water and Wate [sic; water] courses with all Profits Commodities and Advantages To have and to hold the said Granted Land and Premises with their and every of their Appurtenances unto the said Joseph Phips his Heirs and Assigns forever And she the said Tabitha Phips for herself and her Heirs doth hereby Covenant Grant and to and with the said Joseph Phips his Heirs and Assigns shall and may at all Times hereafter peaceably and quietly hold possess and enjoy the said Granted Land and Premises with every of its Appurtenances free from all former Sales Gifts Mortgages Rights of Dower and every other incumbrance whatsoever and the said Tabitha Phips and her Heirs shall and will warrant and forever defend the said Granted Land with every of its Appurtenances unto the said Joseph Phips his Heirs against all and every Person or Persons laying any Claim thereunto In Witness whereof the said Tabitha Phips hath here unto set her Hand and Seal the Day and Year first above Written

[signed:]
Tabitha her | mark Phips (L. S.)

Signed Sealed and Delivered
In the Presence of [signed:]
Briggs Goodrich Randle Woolsey
John Steed Martha Bennett

At a Court held for Brunswick County the 2[8?] day of July 1777.
This Indenture was proved by the Oaths of Briggs Goodrich Randle Woolsey and Martha Bennett Witnesses thereto and Ordered to be Recorded

Test
Peter Pelham junr. C[t.?] C[ur.?]

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