Map Resources for Phipps Research

Because of the unique nature of Phipps family research, knowledge of the extremely complex county boundary changes (and sometimes, even state or colony boundary changes) in Virginia, North Carolina, and other colonies/states is crucial. This may, in fact, have been the primary factor that has hindered us from achieving more research success in the past. Here are some map-related resources, by request:

Links to Animated County Boundary Change Maps:

Atlas of Historical County Boundaries
From Newberry Library in Chicago. Try the “Interactive Maps” option, which gives you a changing overlay view of county boundary changes.
“Maps of Maryland”
An animated map showing county boundary changes over time.
“Maps of North Carolina”
An animated map showing county boundary changes over time.
“Maps of South Carolina”
An animated map showing county boundary changes over time.
History of County Formations in Virginia 1617-1995
An animated map showing county boundary changes over time.
“Maps of Virginia”
An animated map showing county boundary changes over time.

Some Other Selected General Map Resources:

David Rumsey Map Collection
A highly acclaimed collection of over 30,000 historic maps and related images.
Libre Map Project
Huge, extremely detailed topographic maps. Might be difficult to view on some systems; the best option for viewing large maps that I’ve found is GoodReader on the iPad, which seems to work far better than many desktop computers.
The National Map: Historical Topographic Map Collection
Viewing might be a challenge, depending on what system you’re using.
Perry-Castañeda Library Map Collection
Quality and extent of collection varies, from the University of Texas at Austin.

Some Other State-Specific Map and Related Resources:

Historical Maps of North Carolina
From the University of Alabama.
Historical Maps of Virginia
From the University of Alabama.
North Carolina Historical Data and Maps
Links from NC State University.
North Carolina Maps
From the North Carolina State Archives.
Virginia Gazetteer
Search for places. Entering “phipps,” for instance, will yield two cemeteries, a populated place, and “Phipps Store.” From the University of Virginia Library.
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s