Additional Phipps Web Links

Note that the following are links to a variety of information from a variety of types of sources, some credible, some incredible. Use discretion before accepting materials without documentation or sources cited.

Phipps Families of Bristol, England

You might find the Phipps Families of Bristol web page to be of interest.

Guilford County Mills & Another Ransom Phipps

Three books about Guilford County, North Carolina by Stewart E. Dunaway refer to a mill associated with the Phipps family.

In Guilford County North Carolina Road and Bridge Records Vol. 3 1855-1890, an image of a record appears, headed “Overseer Record – Phipp’s Old Mill to Alamance Church – 1890.” The record which appears on that page, however, refers not to “Phipp’s Old Mill,” but rather to “Phipps & Co’s Mill.” The record pertains to a public road from there to Alamance Church.

Another volume in the same series (Vol. 1 1799-1839) refers to a request to build a road, presumably the same road, to Alamance Church from what appears to be “[S. M.?] Phipps [?] mills in old township.” The record is transcribed as “SW. Phipp’s Mill in old township,” but the name is clearly written as “Phipps,” not as “Phipp’s,” and the word following “Phipps” is not entirely clear. The initials are not entirely clear in the copy provided.

That word appears to read “to,” and definitely not “in.” That would yield the reading “from [S. M.? or S. W.?] Phipps to mills in old township.” “Old township” doesn’t seem to make sense, yet the word “old” seems to be fairly clearly written.

Vol. 2 1840-1854 refers again to what would seem to be the same road, this time referring to a petition for a road from what is transcribed as “George W. Phipp’s land,” past Henry Leviny’s to Robert J. Shaw’s mill.

Looking at the actual record, the 1841 petition refers to a route starting where the “present” road left “george W. phipses’ land near [henery"] Levings [or Livings?] to Robert [H.?] Shaws mill.”

Interestingly, one of the signers of this petition is “Rasom S. Phipps.” This must have been the Ransom S. Phipps who was born about 1815 in Guilford County according to the 1850 census. Why he signed as “Rasom” rather than Ransom is, of course, unknown.

That Ransom married Caroline Ross. They were the parents of Alexander, Robert Sanders, Mary M., and Elizabeth. Robert Sanders (b. abt 1846) married Sally Browning and Mary Anna Gilmer). Mary (1848-1931) married an Ingle, and Elizabeth (1851-1932) married Julius M. Dick.

More on Ransom Phipps of Forsyth Co., NC

Several important points make the family of Ransom Phipps of Forsyth County, North Carolina especially interesting:

  • An older woman, Lydia Phipps (born about 1790 in North Carolina), was in his household in the 1850 and 1860 censuses, most likely his mother.
  • Various records show a close relationship to the Teague family. A previous post noted Phipps and Teague connections. James Phipps married Huster Teague in 1843 in Grainger County, Tennessee, with an 1842 marriage bond date. In addition, Isaac Phipps, born about 1823 in Tennessee, married an Elender Teague in 1845 in Clay County, Kentucky. He later lived in Cedar County, Missouri. In addition, a land grant in Cedar County, Missouri to James Phipps was reassigned 1858 by widow Esther Phipps to Stephen Teague.
  • Forsyth County, North Carolina, where Ransom Phipps lived, is adjacent to Guilford County, North Carolina, suggesting a possibility of some sort of link to the heavily documented Phipps family there. Another Ransom Phipps (Ransom S. Phipps, parents unknown) was born about 4 years after the above Ransom, but in Guilford County according to the 1850 census.
  • The 1829 will of James Phipps in Guilford County, North Carolina mentions his grandson Edward P. Gamble; the 1871 Forsyth County, North Carolina will of Andrew M. Gamble mentions friends Ransom Phipps and Elijah B. Teague, Sr. as guardians of his 5 children and as executors.
  • Ransom Phipps appears to have married in Stokes County, North Carolina, adjacent to Henry County, Virginia. A prior post noted a 1784 deed in Henry County, Virginia involving a James Phips of Brunswick County, Virginia. Moreover, Ephraim Witcher of Henry County, Virginia appears to have left a will in Surry County, North Carolina and appears to tie into the Littleberry Phipps (b. abt 1780-90 NC) family; Littleberry lived in Surry County, North Carolina before moving to Pulaski County, Kentucky and then Lawrence County, Indiana, where other Phipps individuals migrated from Ashe County, North Carolina. (The Witcher name then surfaces in Littleberry’s son John Witcher Phipps, who moved from Lawrence County, Indiana to Adair County, Missouri, where he died in 1887.)

By the way, Ransom Phipps’s wife Chloe or Chloey Idol is said to have descended from John Bernhart Eitel , born abut 1735 in Germany. (In German, Eitel would be pronounced EYE-tel, from which the eventual name Idol could easily have been derived.)

He is said to have come from Holland to England and from there to Philadelphia. The family supposedly moved to North Carolina in what was then Rowan County, later called Forsyth County. They’re buried in Davidson County.

Finally, it should also be noted that Forsyth County, the home of Ransom, didn’t even exist until 1849. That’s when the county was formed from Stokes County. Stokes was formed in 1789 from Surry County. Surry was formed in 1771 from Rowan County.

Rowan is currently adjacent to present-day Forsyth County, as well as the counties of Alleghany County, North Carolina and Grayson County, Virginia, where ample Phipps records have been found.

An Isaac Phipps built a cabin on the south fork of Flatt Creek, where a later Rowan County land entry (1780) shows a James Lewis as living. By the time Lewis acquired the land, Isaac Phipps had either died or moved.

Is there any possibility that he could have been the Isaac Phipps who then shows up in Guilford County records as early as 1781? That was when he bought 200 acres in Guilford County from Bennet Bradford.

An Isaiah Phipps is said to have possibly lived in Rowan County, North Carolina about 1800 before moving several years later to Jackson County, Georgia.

Ransom Phipps: Forsyth Co. NC Will & Probate Data

From Forsyth County, North Carolina Will Book 3, pp. 404-408:

[p. 404:]

Application for letters Testamentary

Forsyth County
In the Superior Court
In the Matter of the Will of Ransom Phipp [sic]
Before W B Stafford
Clerk Superior Court.

J. L. Phipps being duly sworn doth say:

That Ransom Phipps late of said County is dead having first made and published his last will and testament and that J. L. Phipps is the Executor named therein.

Further that the property of the said Ransom Phipps consisting of Real Estate Personal property and solvent credits is worth about $1875.00 so far as can be ascertained at the date of this application and that Louisa Davis, J. L. Phipps Martha D. Stafford, Elizabeth Davis and Jno Phipps are the parties entitled under said will to the said property
[signed:] J. L. Phipps
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 14th day of October 1893
[signed:] W. B. Stafford C.S.C. [i.e. Clerk, Superior Court]

Last Will & Testament of Ransom Phipps

In the name of God Amen: I Ranson [sic] Phipps of the County of Forsyth and State of North Carolina being of sound mind and memory and my mental faculties unimpaired and considering the uncertainty of my earthly existence do for the better settling my outward estate make and ordain this my last will and testament in manner and form that is to say:

First – That my Executor (herein after named) shall provide for my body a decent burial suited to the wishes of my relatives and friends and pay all my funeral expenses together with all my just debts to whomsoever owing out of the moneys that may first come into his hands as a part or parcel of my estate.

Item. I give and devise to my beloved wife Chloey Phipps my entire plantation on which I now live for her natural life or widowhood. I give and bequeath to my beloved wife Chloey Phipps Item. All my household and Kitchen

[p. 405:]

furniture, One Cow and calf, what she may want of hogs on hand all the domestic fowls and poultry One mule first choice of two I now own One buggy and harness single set, a good ample years allowance, my executor shall have power to choose three disinterested men unconnected in any way to the family to lay off a years allowance together with farming tools sufficient for one laborer.

It is my will and desire that my executor after my demise advertise and sell all my personal property not already bequeathed if any and I hereby empower him to collect all debts and moneys due my estate and after paying off all my debts and expenses then divide the remainder if any equally among my five children Louisa Davis, L. J. Phipps, M. D. Stafford, Elizabeth Davis and John Phipps.

I further empower my executor at the demise of my widow to sell all the personal property that she may leave and sell or divide all my lands as they may elect and divide the proceeds equally among my five above named heirs.

And lastly I do hereby constitute and appoint my son J. L. Phipps my lawful Executor to all interests and purposes to execute this my last will and testament according to the true intent and meaning of the same and every part and clause thereof. In witness whereof I the said Ransom Phipps do hereunto set my hand and seal this the twenty ninth day of September in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and eighty one

[signed:] Ransom Phipps (seal)

signed sealed published and declared by the said Ransom Phipps to be his last will and testament in the presence of us who at his request and in his presence do subscribe our names thereto.

[signed:]
A. S. Idol
M. D. Stafford
Levi Ring.

Codicil to Last Will and Testament of Ransom Phipps

I Ransom Phipps of the County and State aforesaid being of sound mind and memory and my mental faculties unimpaired do make and ordain this Codicil to my last will and testament

[p. 406:]

manner and form as follows:

After due deliberation I find I have made advancements to my son Joseph Phipps to the Amount of two hundred dollars in a piece of land and to my son John Phipps certain moneys the amount not exactly Known. I wish and direct that my 3 daughters Louisa Davis, Martha D. Stafford and Elizabeth Davis draw seventy five dollars each before Joseph draws any then Joseph draw twenty five dollars and each of the daughters draw one hundred then John come in and all share and share alike in what there is if any. This my hand and seal.

[signed:] Ransom Phipps (seal)

This June the 4th 1883.

[signed:]
M. D. Stafford
A. S. Idol
Levi Ring.

State of North Carolina
Forsyth County

In the Superior Court

A paper writing purporting to be the last will and testament of Ransom Phipps deceased is exhibited before me the undersigned Clerk of the Superior Court for said County by J. L. Phipps the executor therein mentioned and the due execution thereof by the said Ransom Phipps is proved by the oath and examination of M. D. Stafford and Levi Ring two of the subscribing witnesses thereto; who being duly sworn doth depose and say and each for himself deposeth and saith that he is a subscribing witness to the papers writing now shown him purporting to be the last will and testament of Ransom Phipps that the said Ransom Phipps in the presence of this deponent subscribed his name at the end of said paper writing which is now shown as aforesaid, and which bears date of the 9th day of September 1881.

And the deponent further saith that the said Ransom Phipps the testator aforesaid did at the time of subscribing his name as aforesaid declare the said paper writing so subscribed by him and exhibited to be his

[p. 407:]

last will and testament and this deponent did thereupon subscribe his name at the end of said Will as an attesting witness thereto and at the request and in the presence of said testator.

And this deponent further saith that at the said time when the said testator subscribed his name to the said last Will as aforesaid, and at the time of the deponents subscribing his name as an attesting witness thereto as aforesaid the said Ransom Phipps was of sound mind and memory, of full age to execute a will, and was not under any restraint to the Knowledge, information or belief of this deponent. And further these deponents say not.

[signed:]
M. D. Stafford
Levi Ring

Severally sworn and subscribed this 14th day of October 1893 before me.
[signed:] W. B. Stafford C.S.C.

State of North Carolina
Forsyth County

In the Superior Court

A paper writing purporting to be a Codicil to the last Will and testament of Ransom Phipps deceased is exhibited before me the undersigned Clerk of the Superior Court for said County by J. L. Phipps the Executor therein mentioned, and the due execution thereof by the said Ransom Phipps is proved by the oath and examination of M. D. Stafford and Levi Ring the subscribing witnesses thereto who being duly sworn doth depose and say and each for himself deposeth and saith that he is a subscribing witness to the paper writing now shown and purporting to be a Codicil to the last Will and testament of Ransom Phipps that the said Ransom Phipps in the presence of this deponent subscribed his name at the end of said paper writing now shown as aforesaid, and which bears date of the 4th day of June 1893. And the deponent further saith that the said Ransom Phipps the testator aforesaid did at the time of subscribing his name as aforesaid declare the said paper writing as subscribed by him and exhibited to be a Codicil to his last will and testament and this deponent

[p. 408:]

did thereupon subscribe his name at the end of said will as an attesting witness thereto, and at the request and in the presence of the said testator. And this deponent further saith that at the said time when the said testator subscribed his name to the said last Codicil to his will as aforesaid, and at the time of deponents subscribing his name as an attesting witness thereto as aforesaid the said Ransom Phipps was of sound mind and memory, of full age to execute a will, and was not under any restraint to the Knowledge information or belief of this deponent.

And further these deponents say not.

[signed:]
M. D. Stafford
Levi Ring

Severally sworn and subscribed this 14th day of October 1893 before me.
[signed:]
W. B. Stafford C.S.C.

North Carolina
Forsyth County

In the Superior Court.

It is therefore considered and adjudged by the Court that the said paper writing and every part thereof is the last Will and testament of Ransom Phipps deceased. Let the said will together with the probate be recorded and filed.

This 14th day of Oct. 1893.
[signed:]
W. B. Stafford C.S.C.

I J. L. Phipps do swear that I believe this writing to be and to contain the last will and testament of Ransom Phipps deceased; and that I will well and truly execute the same by first paying his debts and then his legacies as far as the said estate shall extend or the law shall charge me; and that I will well and faithfully execute the office of an Executor agreeable to the trust and confidence reposed in me according to law. So help me God.

[signed:] J. L. Phipps Exr.

Sworn to and subscribed before me this the 14th day of October 1893.
[signed:]
W. B. Stafford
Clerk Superior Court.

Ahart Phipps, in Support of William Weaver

The following may be of interest not just because it was witnessed by Ahart Phipps, but because it mentions relatives of other surnames. This would presumably be the Ahart Phipps of Ashe County, North Carolina who was born about 1813-1816 and who is discussed in Eastern Cherokee Applications.

From what appears to be a stray document from the Revolutionary War pension file of William Weaver of Ashe County, North Carolina:

Power of Attorney Revolutionary Pension Claim

Know all men by these presents that I William Weaver of Ashe County State of North Carolina son of Mrs Nancy Weaver de’d. widow of William Weaver de’d. a soldier of the Revolution whereby irrevocable Constitute and appoint Noah Long of Ashe county state of North Carolina and James Calloway of Wilkesboro – NC, my true and lawful agent and attorney to prosicute [sic; prosecute] for me the claim of Mrs Nancy Weaver De’d. widow of William Weaver De’d. for any amount of Revolutionary pension or increase of pension that may be due – and I hereby authorize my said agents to examine all papers and documents in relation to Said claim on fial [sic; file] in the department at Washington City or else where to fial additional evidence or arguments and to receive the Certificate which may be issued for said claim and to appoint one or m[ore?] substitutes under them for the purpose herein expressed and to do all things that I might or could [unclear] I personally present – hereby ratifying and confirming all that my said attorney and agents should lawfully do in the premises and revoking all former powers
Witness my hand and seal October 28th A D 1854
[signed:] Wm Weaver
signed and sealed in the presents [sic; presence] of
[signed:]
witness James Johnson
witness Ahart Phipps

State of North Carolina
County of Ashe
On this 28th day of October A D 1854 before me the subscriber a Justice of the peace in and for the county and state aforesaid personally appeared William Weaver and acknowledged the foregoing power of attorney to be his act and [deed?] for the purpose therein mentioned – In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand the day and year aforesaid
[signed:] [Wm.?] Johnson J.P.

Ransom Phipps: “Bad Enough” of a Scribe

At least two 19th century individuals were named Ransom Phipps. One was born about 1815 in Guilford County, North Carolina according to the 1850 census. A marriage bond in that county dated 26 January 1838 concerns his marriage to Caroline Ross.

Another Ransom Phipps was born about 1810 in North Carolina according to the 1860 and 1870 censuses, about 1812 in North Carolina according to the 1880 census, and in Alamance County, North Carolina according to the death certificate of his son Joseph. The death certificate of his daughter Louisa, however, says that he was born in Forsyth County, North Carolina. In the 1860, 1870, and 1880 censuses he was living in Forsyth County.

 

He appears to have married Chloe Idol in Stokes County, North Carolina 20 January 1833. Stokes is adjacent to Forsyth. Alamance and Forsyth are both adjacent to Guilford. Does the geography, plus the repetition of the name Ransom, indicate a connection between these individuals?

On 30 August 1860, Ransom, presumably the same one, was a delegate from Forsyth County to the Douglas Convention in Raleigh. Their aim was to encourage the election of Stephen Douglas as U.S. President over Abraham Lincoln.

Ransom doesn’t appear to have been extremely literate, however. Below is a letter he wrote in 1874 in support of the War of 1812 pension application of Joseph Idol of North Carolina:

Deep River N. C.
Feb 4th 1874
Mr Secretary Interior Washington

Dr Sir

the administrator of Joseph Idol Some time back Rec’d. Instructions from you to forward all the information he Could giv Concerning a forty acre land warrant Granted his Intestate Father together with date of act of Congress authorizeing the Same All hee Can doe is to Say his father Joseph Idol was a Soldier in the war of 1812 and Rec’d a land warrant for 40 acres and Returned it through J. F [Kernea?] the Date not known and after that the Dec’d. Rec’d. another warrant for 120 acres whitch the Administrator Sold at the Sale of the property of the Dec’d. and my Wife Chloey Phipps purchased the Same [& holdg?] it [now? or has?] not located
those are the facts in the Case and [ef?] Sworn to By the administrator Before the Clerk of the Court or a Justice of the Peace with the Certificate of the Clerk attached there to Will it enable him to get the warrant in question

Yours Truly
Andrew S. Idol Adm
Per Ransom Phipps

[page break]

N B [i.e. nota bene] the reason the 40 acre warrant was returned the holder was advised So to doe after it was ascertained he was entitled to 120 acres [more?] and have all in one makeing 160 acres
and the Reason the Administrator A. S. Idol does not write him Self he is a wors Scribe than I am you See I am bad Enough

[signed:] Ransom Phipps