Ransom Phipps: Forsyth Co. NC Will & Probate Data

From Forsyth County, North Carolina Will Book 3, pp. 404-408:

[p. 404:]

Application for letters Testamentary

Forsyth County
In the Superior Court
In the Matter of the Will of Ransom Phipp [sic]
Before W B Stafford
Clerk Superior Court.

J. L. Phipps being duly sworn doth say:

That Ransom Phipps late of said County is dead having first made and published his last will and testament and that J. L. Phipps is the Executor named therein.

Further that the property of the said Ransom Phipps consisting of Real Estate Personal property and solvent credits is worth about $1875.00 so far as can be ascertained at the date of this application and that Louisa Davis, J. L. Phipps Martha D. Stafford, Elizabeth Davis and Jno Phipps are the parties entitled under said will to the said property
[signed:] J. L. Phipps
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 14th day of October 1893
[signed:] W. B. Stafford C.S.C. [i.e. Clerk, Superior Court]

Last Will & Testament of Ransom Phipps

In the name of God Amen: I Ranson [sic] Phipps of the County of Forsyth and State of North Carolina being of sound mind and memory and my mental faculties unimpaired and considering the uncertainty of my earthly existence do for the better settling my outward estate make and ordain this my last will and testament in manner and form that is to say:

First – That my Executor (herein after named) shall provide for my body a decent burial suited to the wishes of my relatives and friends and pay all my funeral expenses together with all my just debts to whomsoever owing out of the moneys that may first come into his hands as a part or parcel of my estate.

Item. I give and devise to my beloved wife Chloey Phipps my entire plantation on which I now live for her natural life or widowhood. I give and bequeath to my beloved wife Chloey Phipps Item. All my household and Kitchen

[p. 405:]

furniture, One Cow and calf, what she may want of hogs on hand all the domestic fowls and poultry One mule first choice of two I now own One buggy and harness single set, a good ample years allowance, my executor shall have power to choose three disinterested men unconnected in any way to the family to lay off a years allowance together with farming tools sufficient for one laborer.

It is my will and desire that my executor after my demise advertise and sell all my personal property not already bequeathed if any and I hereby empower him to collect all debts and moneys due my estate and after paying off all my debts and expenses then divide the remainder if any equally among my five children Louisa Davis, L. J. Phipps, M. D. Stafford, Elizabeth Davis and John Phipps.

I further empower my executor at the demise of my widow to sell all the personal property that she may leave and sell or divide all my lands as they may elect and divide the proceeds equally among my five above named heirs.

And lastly I do hereby constitute and appoint my son J. L. Phipps my lawful Executor to all interests and purposes to execute this my last will and testament according to the true intent and meaning of the same and every part and clause thereof. In witness whereof I the said Ransom Phipps do hereunto set my hand and seal this the twenty ninth day of September in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and eighty one

[signed:] Ransom Phipps (seal)

signed sealed published and declared by the said Ransom Phipps to be his last will and testament in the presence of us who at his request and in his presence do subscribe our names thereto.

[signed:]
A. S. Idol
M. D. Stafford
Levi Ring.

Codicil to Last Will and Testament of Ransom Phipps

I Ransom Phipps of the County and State aforesaid being of sound mind and memory and my mental faculties unimpaired do make and ordain this Codicil to my last will and testament

[p. 406:]

manner and form as follows:

After due deliberation I find I have made advancements to my son Joseph Phipps to the Amount of two hundred dollars in a piece of land and to my son John Phipps certain moneys the amount not exactly Known. I wish and direct that my 3 daughters Louisa Davis, Martha D. Stafford and Elizabeth Davis draw seventy five dollars each before Joseph draws any then Joseph draw twenty five dollars and each of the daughters draw one hundred then John come in and all share and share alike in what there is if any. This my hand and seal.

[signed:] Ransom Phipps (seal)

This June the 4th 1883.

[signed:]
M. D. Stafford
A. S. Idol
Levi Ring.

State of North Carolina
Forsyth County

In the Superior Court

A paper writing purporting to be the last will and testament of Ransom Phipps deceased is exhibited before me the undersigned Clerk of the Superior Court for said County by J. L. Phipps the executor therein mentioned and the due execution thereof by the said Ransom Phipps is proved by the oath and examination of M. D. Stafford and Levi Ring two of the subscribing witnesses thereto; who being duly sworn doth depose and say and each for himself deposeth and saith that he is a subscribing witness to the papers writing now shown him purporting to be the last will and testament of Ransom Phipps that the said Ransom Phipps in the presence of this deponent subscribed his name at the end of said paper writing which is now shown as aforesaid, and which bears date of the 9th day of September 1881.

And the deponent further saith that the said Ransom Phipps the testator aforesaid did at the time of subscribing his name as aforesaid declare the said paper writing so subscribed by him and exhibited to be his

[p. 407:]

last will and testament and this deponent did thereupon subscribe his name at the end of said Will as an attesting witness thereto and at the request and in the presence of said testator.

And this deponent further saith that at the said time when the said testator subscribed his name to the said last Will as aforesaid, and at the time of the deponents subscribing his name as an attesting witness thereto as aforesaid the said Ransom Phipps was of sound mind and memory, of full age to execute a will, and was not under any restraint to the Knowledge, information or belief of this deponent. And further these deponents say not.

[signed:]
M. D. Stafford
Levi Ring

Severally sworn and subscribed this 14th day of October 1893 before me.
[signed:] W. B. Stafford C.S.C.

State of North Carolina
Forsyth County

In the Superior Court

A paper writing purporting to be a Codicil to the last Will and testament of Ransom Phipps deceased is exhibited before me the undersigned Clerk of the Superior Court for said County by J. L. Phipps the Executor therein mentioned, and the due execution thereof by the said Ransom Phipps is proved by the oath and examination of M. D. Stafford and Levi Ring the subscribing witnesses thereto who being duly sworn doth depose and say and each for himself deposeth and saith that he is a subscribing witness to the paper writing now shown and purporting to be a Codicil to the last Will and testament of Ransom Phipps that the said Ransom Phipps in the presence of this deponent subscribed his name at the end of said paper writing now shown as aforesaid, and which bears date of the 4th day of June 1893. And the deponent further saith that the said Ransom Phipps the testator aforesaid did at the time of subscribing his name as aforesaid declare the said paper writing as subscribed by him and exhibited to be a Codicil to his last will and testament and this deponent

[p. 408:]

did thereupon subscribe his name at the end of said will as an attesting witness thereto, and at the request and in the presence of the said testator. And this deponent further saith that at the said time when the said testator subscribed his name to the said last Codicil to his will as aforesaid, and at the time of deponents subscribing his name as an attesting witness thereto as aforesaid the said Ransom Phipps was of sound mind and memory, of full age to execute a will, and was not under any restraint to the Knowledge information or belief of this deponent.

And further these deponents say not.

[signed:]
M. D. Stafford
Levi Ring

Severally sworn and subscribed this 14th day of October 1893 before me.
[signed:]
W. B. Stafford C.S.C.

North Carolina
Forsyth County

In the Superior Court.

It is therefore considered and adjudged by the Court that the said paper writing and every part thereof is the last Will and testament of Ransom Phipps deceased. Let the said will together with the probate be recorded and filed.

This 14th day of Oct. 1893.
[signed:]
W. B. Stafford C.S.C.

I J. L. Phipps do swear that I believe this writing to be and to contain the last will and testament of Ransom Phipps deceased; and that I will well and truly execute the same by first paying his debts and then his legacies as far as the said estate shall extend or the law shall charge me; and that I will well and faithfully execute the office of an Executor agreeable to the trust and confidence reposed in me according to law. So help me God.

[signed:] J. L. Phipps Exr.

Sworn to and subscribed before me this the 14th day of October 1893.
[signed:]
W. B. Stafford
Clerk Superior Court.

Ahart Phipps, in Support of William Weaver

The following may be of interest not just because it was witnessed by Ahart Phipps, but because it mentions relatives of other surnames. This would presumably be the Ahart Phipps of Ashe County, North Carolina who was born about 1813-1816 and who is discussed in Eastern Cherokee Applications.

From what appears to be a stray document from the Revolutionary War pension file of William Weaver of Ashe County, North Carolina:

Power of Attorney Revolutionary Pension Claim

Know all men by these presents that I William Weaver of Ashe County State of North Carolina son of Mrs Nancy Weaver de’d. widow of William Weaver de’d. a soldier of the Revolution whereby irrevocable Constitute and appoint Noah Long of Ashe county state of North Carolina and James Calloway of Wilkesboro – NC, my true and lawful agent and attorney to prosicute [sic; prosecute] for me the claim of Mrs Nancy Weaver De’d. widow of William Weaver De’d. for any amount of Revolutionary pension or increase of pension that may be due – and I hereby authorize my said agents to examine all papers and documents in relation to Said claim on fial [sic; file] in the department at Washington City or else where to fial additional evidence or arguments and to receive the Certificate which may be issued for said claim and to appoint one or m[ore?] substitutes under them for the purpose herein expressed and to do all things that I might or could [unclear] I personally present – hereby ratifying and confirming all that my said attorney and agents should lawfully do in the premises and revoking all former powers
Witness my hand and seal October 28th A D 1854
[signed:] Wm Weaver
signed and sealed in the presents [sic; presence] of
[signed:]
witness James Johnson
witness Ahart Phipps

State of North Carolina
County of Ashe
On this 28th day of October A D 1854 before me the subscriber a Justice of the peace in and for the county and state aforesaid personally appeared William Weaver and acknowledged the foregoing power of attorney to be his act and [deed?] for the purpose therein mentioned – In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand the day and year aforesaid
[signed:] [Wm.?] Johnson J.P.

Ransom Phipps: “Bad Enough” of a Scribe

At least two 19th century individuals were named Ransom Phipps. One was born about 1815 in Guilford County, North Carolina according to the 1850 census. A marriage bond in that county dated 26 January 1838 concerns his marriage to Caroline Ross.

Another Ransom Phipps was born about 1810 in North Carolina according to the 1860 and 1870 censuses, about 1812 in North Carolina according to the 1880 census, and in Alamance County, North Carolina according to the death certificate of his son Joseph. The death certificate of his daughter Louisa, however, says that he was born in Forsyth County, North Carolina. In the 1860, 1870, and 1880 censuses he was living in Forsyth County.

 

He appears to have married Chloe Idol in Stokes County, North Carolina 20 January 1833. Stokes is adjacent to Forsyth. Alamance and Forsyth are both adjacent to Guilford. Does the geography, plus the repetition of the name Ransom, indicate a connection between these individuals?

On 30 August 1860, Ransom, presumably the same one, was a delegate from Forsyth County to the Douglas Convention in Raleigh. Their aim was to encourage the election of Stephen Douglas as U.S. President over Abraham Lincoln.

Ransom doesn’t appear to have been extremely literate, however. Below is a letter he wrote in 1874 in support of the War of 1812 pension application of Joseph Idol of North Carolina:

Deep River N. C.
Feb 4th 1874
Mr Secretary Interior Washington

Dr Sir

the administrator of Joseph Idol Some time back Rec’d. Instructions from you to forward all the information he Could giv Concerning a forty acre land warrant Granted his Intestate Father together with date of act of Congress authorizeing the Same All hee Can doe is to Say his father Joseph Idol was a Soldier in the war of 1812 and Rec’d a land warrant for 40 acres and Returned it through J. F [Kernea?] the Date not known and after that the Dec’d. Rec’d. another warrant for 120 acres whitch the Administrator Sold at the Sale of the property of the Dec’d. and my Wife Chloey Phipps purchased the Same [& holdg?] it [now? or has?] not located
those are the facts in the Case and [ef?] Sworn to By the administrator Before the Clerk of the Court or a Justice of the Peace with the Certificate of the Clerk attached there to Will it enable him to get the warrant in question

Yours Truly
Andrew S. Idol Adm
Per Ransom Phipps

[page break]

N B [i.e. nota bene] the reason the 40 acre warrant was returned the holder was advised So to doe after it was ascertained he was entitled to 120 acres [more?] and have all in one makeing 160 acres
and the Reason the Administrator A. S. Idol does not write him Self he is a wors Scribe than I am you See I am bad Enough

[signed:] Ransom Phipps

Who Was this James Phipps?

Who was this James Phipps? He might tie into Brunswick County, Virginia, and he appears to have had Randolph County, North Carolina connections. Randolph County is adjacent to Guilford County where a well-established and documented Phipps family is found.

James Phipps data:

  • Born about 1832 NC (1880 census); born about 1833 NC (1870 census); born in Randolph County, North Carolina according to the death certificate of son Billie and the death record of daughter Ida
  • Resided 5 Jul 1870 Chapel Hill Township, Orange County, North Carolina, listed in census as James Phipps, cabinet workman
  • Resided 29 Jun 1880 Chapel Hill Township, Orange County, North Carolina, listed in census as James Phipps, carriage and wagon maker
  • Married Julia King (death certificate of son Billie; death record of daughter Ida); married Julia (1870 and 1880 censuses)
  • Both his parents born in North Carolina (1880 census)

Children of James Phipps/Julia King included:

  • Billie Green Phipps, born 6 Dec 1867 Orange County, North Carolina (death certificate), died 4 May 1930 Carrboro, Orange County, North Carolina where he had lied 16 years (death certificate)
  • Ida Elizabeth Phipps, born 1 May 1880 Orange County, North Carolina (death record) or about 1859 in North Carolina (1880 census), died 11 May 1941 Chapel Hill Township, Orange County, North Carolina (death record), buried 12 May 1941 Bethel Cemetery, Orange County, North Carolina (death record)
  • Charles Reid Phipps, born 17 Mar 1872 (tombstone) or about 1873 in Orange County, North Carolina (death certificate), died 9 Feb 1930 Durham, Durham Township, Durham County, North Carolina (death certificate) or 9 Feb 1930 (tombstone), late residence 1820 Chapel Hill Street in Durham (death certificate), occupation at death carpenter and janitor at Lakewood Baptist Church (death certificate), married Kate Weaver (Tombstone daughter Sally) or Connie Weaver (NCpedia), buried 9 Feb 1930 Bethel Church (death certificate) or Bethel Baptist Church Cemetery, Orange County, North Carolina (Find A Grave with tombstone photo)

Charles Reid Phipps was the father of Luther James Phipps, born 20 Mar 1898 about 1 1/2 miles from Chapel Hill (see tombstone photo and “Enter L.J. Phipps,” Carolina Magazine, Apr 1922, p. 25), died 1 Oct 1969 and buried Chapel Hill Memorial Cemetery, Orange County, North Carolina (Find A Grave with tombstone photo).

Note the above points regarding James Phipps:

  • married Julia King
  • had a son named Billie Green Phipps
  • lived in Randolph County, North Carolina
  • lived in Orange County, North Carolina
  • descendants lived in Durham County, North Carolina

Coincidences:

  • James had a son Billie Green Phipps. A Green Phipps, born about 1825 in North Carolina, is listed in the 1860 census in Orange County, North Carolina.
  • James lived in Orange County and descendants lived in Durham County. Ambrose Phipps who was born about 1805 in North Carolina lived in Wake County and then Durham County and then Orange County and then Granville County. That Ambrose was a son of Dudley Phipps of Orange County, then Wake County, then Carroll County, Tennessee.
  • James married Julia King, born about 1839-42 in Orange County, North Carolina. Winfield Phipps, born about 1801 in Virginia, married Julia Ann King, born about 1820 in Brunswick County, Virginia.
  • James Phipps was living in Randolph County, North Carolina according to death data on two of his children. Does it mean anything that this county is adjacent to (south of) Guilford County?

Benjamin Phipps, Confederate Deserter

From The North Carolina Standard, Wed., 21 Jan 1863, p. 3:

Two Thousand Forty Dollars Reward.
Headq’rs, 26th Regt. N. C. Troops,
GARYSBURG, N. C., Jan. 16th, 1863.

Deserted from this regiment, the following named persons, for whose apprehension and delivery, the above reward will be paid, or thirty dollars for each one so delivered:

Company A.
Thomas Burgess, Ashe Co.
Rudolph [Rane?], Ashe Co.
Hugh Farmington, Ashe Co.
Benjamin Phipps, Ashe Co.
James Harris, Ashe Co.
Thos Rutherford, Ashe Co.

[followed by other companies in other counties]

1801 Marriage Bond, Rowan Co., NC

Note: There’s a slight possibility that the name of the bride could have been Caty Day rather than Dry, but it appears to be Dry. Caty was presumably a creative spelling of Katy, short for Katherine.

State of North-Carolina,
Rowan County.

KNOW all Men by these presents, That we John Fips & Henry Bower – in the state aforesaid, are held and firmly bound unto Max Chambers – Esquire, Chairman of the court of the county aforesaid, in the just and full sum of Five Hundred Pounds, current money of this state, to be paid to the said Chairman, or his successors or assigns: To the which payment well and truly to be made and done, we bind ourselves, our heirs, executors and administrators. Sealed with our seals, and dated this 28th day of July anno Dom. 1801

The Condition of the above obligation is such, That whereas the above bounden John Fips – hath made application for a License for a marriage to be celebrated between him and Caty Dry – of the county aforesaid: Now in case it shall not appear hereafter, that there is any lawful cause to obstruct the said marriage, then the above obligation to be void, otherwise to remain in full force and virtue.

[signed:] John his + mark Fips (Seal)

Sealed and delivered in the presence of us
[signed:] Jno. B[run?]

[signed:] G[?] Co[?] (Seal)

Some Descendants of George Phipps

George Phipps was a son of Jesse Phipps (about 1786/8 to 1865) and his wife Jennie Spurlin. Jesse was born in Ashe County, North Carolina, moved to Owen County, Indiana in the 1830s, and died in Putnam County, Missouri.

His son George has been the most difficult of Jesse’s children to research. Even close family members didn’t know where he was, or if he was dead or alive, when George’s father died in 1865, according to probate records.

According to census reports, George Phipps was born about 1807. Sources differ as to where he was born. The 1852 California state census said Kentucky. The 1880 census listing for his son Samuel said that Samuel’s father George was born in Virginia. The 1900 census listing for George’s daughter Nancy said that George was born in North Carolina.

George Phipps married Nancy Hall 13 March 1834 in Owen County, Indiana, according to marriage abstracts. He shows up in the 1843 tax list in Jefferson Township, where he had earlier bought land that then sold to his brother Matthew Phipps.

In 1847 and 1849, the Iowa state census shows him living in Van Buren County. The federal census on 22 Nov 1850, however, shows his wife and children living without him in Union Township, Van Buren County, Iowa. Where was George?

Reed, in his 1923 History of Sacramento County (p. 428) says that George came to California in 1849. Then could he have been the George Phipps who founded the Gold Rush town of Georgetown in El Dorado County, California. At least one source says, however, that the George Phipps who founded Georgetown was from Massachusetts. Was that correct?

Reed says that George then returned to his “eastern home” from California in 1851. He then set out for California by way of Salt Lake with his family. According to Reed, they arrived that year in Stockton, where George ran a hotel. Stockton is in San Joaquin County.

The 1852 California state census then shows Geo. Fips, with last residence in Iowa, living in San Joaquin County on 15 October 1852. His age is given as 45, and the record says he was born in Kentucky. There he is listed with his wife and children.

Then, however, George went east on a business trip after two years in Stockton. This would have been about 1853. On that trip, he died of smallpox in New York.

Children of George Phipps and Nancy (Hall) Phipps:

1. Samuel Phipps, born about 1835-1841, died 1904
2. William Phipps, born about 1837-1838
3. Jesse Phipps, born about 1838-1840, died 1890
4. Nancy Jane Phipps, born 1841
5. Celia Phipps, born about 1845-1846
6. Lavinia, born about 1848
7. Elizabeth, born Feb 1848 or 1849, d. 1941

1. Samuel Phipps

Samuel Phipps, son of George Phipps/Nancy Hall, was born about 1835-1841 in Indiana, Illinois, or Virginia, depending on which census record or California Great Register record is consulted. He was most likely born in Owen County, Indiana, considering the likely whereabouts of the parents.

He is listed as Samuel Phipps, living with his mother and siblings, in the 1850 census in Van Buren County, Iowa. Then in 1852, he is listed with them in San Joaquin County, California, but this time as Saml Fips. He was 18.

Samuel married Bridget Jolly in San Joaquin County on 26 October 1863. The record can be found in County Marriage Book 2, p. 169.  At the time of their marriage, they both lived in Stockton. Census records show her as born in Ireland about 1839-1841 (one record says June 1830).

Then, however, we enter into some questions and issues regarding records. From this point, the data becomes a bit confused because of 3 factors: (1) Someone extracting vital statistic information from California newspapers indicated in a list that Bridget Jolly Phipps died in 1870, which does not appear to be the case. (2) Some news accounts refer to Samuel Phipps and his wife “Kate Jolly.” Evidently this was Bridget Jolly Phipps, although if so, it’s unclear why she would be called that. (3) In 1909, “Mrs. Kate Phipps,” if her, committed an unspeakably horrible violent crime, according to the press. If the account was true, one wouldn’t think she would then return to normal life, but she then seems to appear living in the census in 1910.

Samuel Phipps was appointed an appraiser of the estate of William Wise, deceased, as reported in a Sacramento paper on 12 June 1866. Presumably this was the same Samuel; Samuel’s sister Nancy married Joseph Wise, and they had a son William Wise.

The press then reported that on 13 April 1867 in Sacramento, Samuel Phipps’s wife “Kate Joly” (also referred to as “Kate Jolly”) and John Clooney stole Samuel’s tool chest in which he had hidden $1,700. This would seem to be the same Samuel, but why his wife would be called “Kate Joly” isn’t clear.

She and Clooney were arrested for grand larceny. Samuel Phipps claimed that he had hidden the money, in coin form, in his tool chest under his bed. He had thought that it would there be safe from his wife. She told the police, however, that he had never owned that amount of money, that he didn’t even own a hammer, let alone a chest full of tools, and that the only box under the bed was an old box containing a few onions.

The police court released Samuel’s wife and John Clooney after finding Samuel’s story so “contradictory and improbable,” as a news article put it, that a suggestion was made that Samuel should be arrested for perjury. The judge decided not to arrest him, since he believed Samuel was insane.

That was on 13 April 1867 in Sacramento. The post office then released a list of “letters remaining” on 16 May 1867. Post offices in those days commonly published such lists of unclaimed letters as a warning before they were destroyed. Often such lists indicate that the person had moved on, which would appear likely in this case.

By the time of the next census, 7 July 1870, it became evident that he had moved to San Francisco. There he’s listed as a carpenter. In the 1880 census, on 3 June 1880. he was working in a carpenter shop in San Francisco. The family was then living at 136 Langton Street.

Another news item surfaced in 1895. An individual named Samuel Phipps in San Francisco, but without being identified, shot his wife in the leg on the 9th of November of the previous year. The hospital thought in March of 1895 that her leg would require amputation, but she refused to register a complaint against her husband. A policeman arrested him anyway, and he was charged with assault to murder. Bond was set at $5,000.

That Samuel Phipps, who presumably was the same one who had married Bridget Jolly, was sentenced to three months in the county jail for assault. The 1900 census (4 June 1900) then shows Bridget living at 248 1/2 Harriet Street in San Francisco. She is listed as married and is living with the children, but he is not in the household.

Samuel, presumably the same one, then died 17 August 1904 in the City and County Hospital in San Francisco. That’s not the end of the story, however. While his body was being taken to the cemetery by horse-drawn hearse on 21 August 1904, as the hearse traveled on Mission Street south of the old St. Mary’s College Building, the horses were startled by the sound of an approaching street car and the car collided with the hearse.

The hearse was completely destroyed, but the casket was not. The body was transferred to another hearse and was taken to the cemetery. The account of the incident in the local press refers to Samuel as Samuel T. Phipps.

Then on 6 July 1909, a Mrs. Kate Phipps attacked Mary Ryan in Lexington, as reported in the local press. This was presumably Lexington, California, which is in Santa Clara County not far from San Francisco.

The press didn’t identify this Mrs. Kate Phipps, but she was referred to as “a neighbor” of the young woman who was attacked. Mary Ryan was described as a “young Irish girl” (and Bridget was Irish).

This Kate Phipps, who seems likely to have been the same individual, was charged with throwing carbolic acid onto the girl’s face, then cutting her on the face and hands with a knife. The article reporting this is titled “Mutilates Girl Who Had Rosy Cheeks.” Mrs. Phipps was reported as having said, “If I can’t have rosy cheeks, you can’t. Everybody likes you. Nobody likes me.”

Then, however, the census on the 3rd and 4th of May, 1910, shows what appears to be her living at 362 Richland Avenue in San Francisco, at age 70. Does that mean that the “Mrs. Kate Phipps” of the incident was a different woman? Or were the charges false?

A Bridget Phipps is said to be buried at Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery in San Mateo County. She died 17 July 1917. Whether this is the same Bridget is unclear, but it would seem likely.

Children of Samuel and Bridget were (1) Kate, (2) Jessie W. (male), and (3) Mary E. Phipps. Kate appears to have died early. She was born about 1864 in California according to the 1870 census, but doesn’t appear with her parents in the 1880 or 1900 census. The 1900 census shows her siblings with the notation that her mother had 3 children, but that only 2 were living.

Jessie W. (spelled Jessie) was born August 1871, 1872, or 1873, according to census reports. The 1900 census shows him as a 28-year-old carpenter living with his mother and sister at 248 1/2 Harriet Street in San Francisco. The 1910 census shows him as still living with them on 362 Richland Avenue. He was a house carpenter at the time.

The 1920 census, however, shows him as Jesse W. Phipps, an inmate in the Stockton State Hospital. That was California’s first psychiatric hospital. Celia Phipps, sister of Jessie’s father Samuel, was placed in the same hospital.

Mary E. Phipps, the third child of Samuel and Bridget, was born December 1875 in California according to the 1900 census. She appears as Mary E., a 24-year-old single laborer, living with her mother and brother in the 1900 census.

2. William Phipps

William Phipps, another son of George Phipps/Nancy Hall, was born about 1837 or 1838 in Indiana, according to censuses. The 1850 census shows him living with his mother and siblings in Van Buren County, Iowa, then with his family in 1852 in San Joaquin County, California in the state census.

He is listed as Wm. Phips (presumably him), a day laborer in the household of Sharp, in the census on 27 June 1860. This was in Georgiana Township, Sacramento County, California.

3. Jesse Phipps

Another son of George Phipps/Nancy Hall was Jesse Phipps. He was born about 1838-1840 in Indiana, Ohio, or Indiana, depending on census report. One news article says he was born about 1838 in Ohio. As was the case with William, he appears with his family in the 1850 census in Iowa and the 1852 state census in San Joaquin County, California. There he’s lsited as Jesse Fips, age 12.

The next federal census, 27 June 1860, shows him in Sacramento County. He is listed  as [J.?] Phips, a farm laborer in the household of Francis Whittaker in Georgiana Township, Sacramento County. This is next door to his brother William.

He is listed as Jesse Phipps, farmer in Georgiana Township, Sacramento County, in the 1870 census, and in Sacramento County in the 1880 census. According to the latter census, he couldn’t read or write.

A news report of his death says that he moved from Walnut Grove in Sacramento County to Lodi in San Joaquin County about 1884. He was found dead at his home in Lodi on 30 September 1890. His home was described as a “neat little cottage which he owned.” He was unmarried, and was said to be worth about $8,000. He appears to be the subject of Estate 1781, filed 3 October 1890 in San Joaquin County Superior Court, Book C.

4. Nancy Jane Phipps

Nancy Jane Phipps, who was another child of George Phipps/Nancy Hall, was born 22 October 1841 according to Reed’s 1923 History of Sacramento County (p. 428). She is also listed in those same two censuses, from 1850 and 1852. The 1852 state census refers to her as “Nacy” J. Fips, age 10, born in Indiana.

She came with her brother George to Walnut Grove in 1855, according to Reed. When she was 15, she married Joseph Wise on 23 October 1856 according to Reed. This squares with the 1900 census, shows suggests that they married about 1856.

Her husband Joseph Wise was born in Cape Girardeau County, Missouri about 1830, according to a combination of Reed’s history and the 1900 census. He was a son of Philip Wise according to Reed. The census lists him as Joseph Wise, farmer, on 21 June 1900 in Georgiana Township, Sacramento County, California.

A child of Joseph and Nancy Jane (Phipps) Wise was David D. Wise. He was born July 1876 in California according to the 1900 census.

5. Celia Phipps

Nancy Jane’s sister Celia was born about 1845-1852 in Iowa, Indiana, or “US,” depending on which census record is examined. She is listed in the 1852 California state census as Celia Fips, age 7, born in Indiana.

The 1900 census lists her as Celia Phipps, and shows her as a patient in the Stockton State Hospital. This is the same hospital in which Jesse W., above, was placed.

6. Lavinia Phipps

Another sister was Lavinia. She was born about 1848 in Iowa according to the 1852 California state census. There she is listed as Lavinia Fips, age 4. She may have been the same person as the individual who is listed in the 1850 census as Elizabeth Phipps (below), born about 1849 in Iowa.

7. Elizabeth Phipps

As noted, she may have been the same person as Lavinia. Elizabeth, another daughter of George Phipps/Nancy Hall, was born in February of 1848 or 1849 in Iowa, according to a combination of census reports and her death record abstract.

She would seem to be the Elizabeth Phips listed in the household of S.C. Tyler in Georgiana Township, Sacramento County, California, in the census on 27 June 1860. She is presumably the Elizabeth Phipps who married William H. Brown about 1871 according to the 1900 census. He was born November 1846 in Missouri according to the 1900 census.

The 1900 census (21 June) shows the couple as living in Sutter Township in Sacramento County. He is listed as William H. Brown, a stock raiser.

The 1940 census (5 April) shows her as Elizabeth Brown, grandmother, in the household of Roy R. Bridenstine in Sacramento. She died 4 May 1941 in Sacramento County according to a death record abstract.

8. George W. Phipps

George W. Phipps, son of George Phipps/Nancy Hall, was born 27 April 1853 in Stockton according to Reed’s 1923 Sacramento County history (p. 434). He married Eliza Jane Wilson 17 October 1875 in Lockeford in San Joaquin County according to Reed. The 1900 census corroborates that George Phipps married Eliza about 1875.

The census on 1 June 1880 shows them as living in Elliott Township, San Joaquin County. He is listed there as George Phipps, a farm laborer. He is listed the same way in the census on 23 June 1900 in Georgiana Township in Sacramento County. He was Republican and Methodist, according to Reed. Reed also claims that he was the model for characters in several Jack London stories, including “The Valley of the Moon.”

Extensive biographical information on George appears in Reed. The children of George W. Phipps and his wife Eliza Jane (Wilson) Phipps were Corda, Elsie, George, Hester, Lois, Mary, Reuben, Nettie, Nellie, Mollie, Hattie, Charles Fredrick, Mabel, Alma, Irene, Lorene, and David Joseph.

Charles Fredrick Phipps was born about 1890 according to a marriage record abstract, but in June 1888 in California according to the 1900 census. He married Minnie Offer 9 April 1914 in San Francisco, according to a marriage abstract. He lived in San Francisco in 1923 according to Reed. Reed calls him Charles, but the marriage record abstract calls him Charles Fredrick Phipps.

David Joseph Phipps, another son of George W. Phipps and his wife Eliza Jane (Wilson) Phipps, was born 23 April 1899 according to his WWI draft registration, He was born in California according to censuses and his death record abstract.

His World War I draft registration, dated 12 September 1918, shows him as living in Walnut Grove in Sacramento County. He was working as a bookkeper for what appears to be “A. [Brown?],” according to that record. George W. Phipps, presumably his father, is listed as his nearest relative, in Walnut Grove.

Reed said that in 1923, David was working as a bookkeeper in the “bank of Alexander Brown” in Walnut Grove. The WWI draft registration describes him as tall, with blue eyes and dark hair.

According to the 1940 census, he lived on 1 April 1935 in Georgiana Township, Sacramento County, then in the same house on 16 April 1940. That census lists him as David J. Phipps, a bank clerk.

David Joseph Phipps died 4 June 1983 in Sacramento County according to a death record abstract. The Social Security Death Index indicates that he died in 1983, with his last residence at Union City, Alameda County.

He is called David in Reed and in the Social Security Death Index, Joseph in the 1900 census, and David Joseph in his death record abstract and WWI draft registration. His social security number was issued in New Mexico.